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ELA G8:M3A:U3:L8

Final Performance Task: Becoming Visible Again

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.8.3)
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.8.1)
  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (L.8.5)

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can use narrative and language techniques to write a creative, well-organized narrative that describes the moment when Miné Okubo “became visible again.”
  • Independent reading book review (from homework)
  • Final Performance Task: Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again After Internment (Group Presentation and Reflection)  
  • Self-assessment of performance task

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Writer (2 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Target (1 minute)

2. Work Time

A. Read-aloud Circles (30 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Self-Assessment of Performance Task (12 minutes)

4. Homework

A. None. 

  • This is the final lesson of Module 3A. In this lesson, students share their final performance task (Final Performance Task: Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again After Internment (Group Presentation and Reflection) with each other. The tone of this final lesson should be celebratory; students have worked very hard for the past several months to get to this point.
  • At the end of this lesson, students complete a self-assessment using the Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again after Internment rubric. Read and consider students’ comments as you grade their final performance tasks. If a student’s self-assessment does not align with your assessment of his or her progress, consider scheduling a time to talk one-on-one to help the student understand how to improve.
  • In advance: Divide students into groups of four for the Read-aloud Circles; consider making your own version of the John Steinbeck quotation.
  • Post: Learning target, John Steinbeck quotation.

Vocabulary

Materials
  • John Steinbeck quotation (optional; one to display)
  • Final Performance Task: Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again After Internment (Group Presentation and Reflection) 
  • Narrative Share task card (one for every four students)
  • Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again after Internment rubric (from Lesson 2; one new blank copy per student)
  • Lined paper (one per student) 

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Writer (2 minutes)

  • Return students’ Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Single Draft Narrative and congratulate them for telling the “rest” of Mine’s story.
  • Draw students’ attention to the posted John Steinbeck quotation. Read it aloud as they follow along silently:

*     “A great lasting story is about everyone or it will not last. The strange and foreign is not interesting—only the deeply personal and familiar.” –John Steinbeck, East of Eden

  • Ask for a volunteer to give the gist of this quotation. Listen for: “The most interesting stories are ones that people can relate to in their own lives.” If students struggle to understand the quotation, ask something like:

* “What does John Steinbeck mean when he says that a good story is ‘about everyone’?”

  •  Ask students to turn and talk:

*     “Even though we have never met Louie Zamperini or Miné Okubo, how might we consider their stories to be ‘about everyone’?”

  • After a few moments, call on several volunteers to share their thoughts. Listen for them to say that Louie and Miné’s stories are universal because they are about ordinary people overcoming great difficulty.
  • If you have another favorite quotation about writing or storytelling (perhaps from a book students have read) that you think will get students excited about sharing their narratives with one another, consider substituting it for the Steinbeck quotation. 

B. Reviewing Learning Target (1 minute)

  • Read today’s learning target aloud as students read along silently:

*     “I can use narrative and language techniques to write a creative, well-organized narrative that describes the moment when Miné Okubo ‘became visible again.’”

  • Explain that today students will have a chance to prove that they have met this learning target by sharing their narratives with each other and completing a self-assessment at the end of class.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Read-aloud Circles (30 minutes)

  • Distribute the Final Performance Task: Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again After Internment (Group Presentation and Reflection) handout.
  • Divide students into groups of four. Distribute the Narrative Share task card. Invite students to read the directions with you, then answer any clarifying questions.
  • Invite students to follow the directions on the task card to share their narratives with each other. Circulate and listen in as they read their narratives aloud.
  • After 20 minutes, draw students’ attention back together. Have each student read aloud the short passage from his or her narrative that the group chose in Step 5 of the Narrative Share task card. After all students have shared, congratulate them on their work during this module.
  • Give students positive praise for specific aspects of their narratives that show mastery of the writing and language standards they have been working toward. 
  • If students are reticent to read their work aloud to the whole class at the end of this block, consider having them read each other’s passages aloud instead. Add a step to the Narrative Share task card telling students to choose who will read each passage to the class.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Self-Assessment of Performance Task (12 minutes)

  •  Distribute a fresh copy of the Narrative Writing: Becoming Visible Again after Internment rubric to each student, as well as a piece of lined paper. Post the following instructions and give students 10 minutes to work:

1. On the rubric, score your own narrative by circling one box for each category.

2. On the paper, explain why you gave yourself these scores.

3. On the paper, describe how Miné “became visible again” in your narrative. Use the words “dehumanization,” “isolation,” “dignity,” and/or “inclusion” in your explanation.

  • When time is up, collect the rubrics and lined paper. 

Assessment

None

Homework

Homework

None

Supporting Materials

None

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