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ELA G8:M1:U3:L6

Revision: Best Draft of “Inside Out” and “Back Again” Poems (Final Performance Task)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write narrative text about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.8.3)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use the writing process to ensure that purpose and audience have been addressed. (W.8.5)
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.8.1)
  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation and spelling to send a clear message to my reader. (L.8.2)

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can write a final draft of two poems describing how the narrator, a refugee, turns “inside out” and “back again” as he or she flees home and adapts to life in a new country.
  • I can create meaning in my “inside out” and “back again” poems by using figurative and descriptive language and purposeful word choice to convey a certain tone.
  • I can use correct grammar and punctuation in my “inside out” and “back again” poems.
  • Best draft of “Inside Out” and “Back Again” poems

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

B.  Return “Inside Out” and “Back Again” Poems with Feedback (6 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Poetry Share in Research Teams (10 minutes)

B.  Writing Best Draft of “Inside Out” and “Back Again” Poems (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Poetry Share with Someone from Another Research Team (7 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Write a short review (no more than three paragraphs) of the novel Inside Out & Back Again for someone who is thinking about reading it.
Answer these questions in your review:

  • What is the book about?
  • What did you think of the book? Why?
  • What was your favorite part of the book? Why?
  • Would you recommend this book to someone? Why/why not?
  • In this lesson, students begin by reviewing teacher feedback on their “Inside Out” and “Back Again” poems (from the mid-unit assessment and the end of unit assessment). They then use the relevant parts of this feedback to guide their revisions to both poems.
  • Students then share their “inside out” and “back again” poems within their research teams. The focus of this poetry share is on alignment of details between the two poems and on making sure it sounds as though the two poems have been written by the same narrator. Students provide feedback on these points by questioning.
  • Students then write their best draft of their “Inside Out” and “Back Again” poems. At the end of the lesson they share their best draft poems with students from another research team in order to learn more about a refugee from somewhere else in the world. They synthesize their learning from this poetry sharing by returning to the idea that refugees come from all over the world and different places in time.
  • If students used computers in Lessons 3 and 4, allow them to use computers to revise.
  • Post: Learning targets, anchor charts.

Vocabulary

VocabularyMaterials

align

  • “Inside Out” and “Back Again” Poetry Rubric (from Lesson 3)
  • Student-Friendly Performance Task Prompt (from Unit 2, Lesson 18)
  • Lined paper (two sheets per student)
  • What Makes an Effective Poem? anchor chart (from Lesson 2)
  • Poetry Share Task Card (one per student)
  • Homework: Inside Out & Back Again Review (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students read through the learning targets with you:

*   “I can write a final draft of two poems describing how the narrator, a refugee, turns “inside out” and
“back again” as he or she flees home and adapts to life in a new country.”

*   “I can create meaning in my “inside out” and “back again” poems by using figurative and descriptive
language and purposeful word choice to convey a certain tone.”

*   “I can use correct grammar and punctuation in my “inside out” and “back again” poems.”

  • Focus on the final learning target and invite students to read to Row 4 of their “Inside Out” and “Back Again” Poetry Rubric. Remind them that even though this is a poem, they still need to use the appropriate grammar and punctuation.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. This also provides a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

B. Return “Inside Out” and “Back Again” Poems with Feedback (6 minutes)

  • Hand out the “inside out” and “back again” poems completed in Lessons 3 and 4 with feedback.
  • Give students time to carefully read the feedback. Circulate to answer any questions students might have about the feedback they have been given.
  • Providing specific and focused feedback helps students to set concrete goals for reaching learning targets.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Poetry Share in Research Teams (10 minutes)

  • Tell the students that, one at a time, they are going to be reading both of their poems aloud to their research teams.
  • Post the following questions for students to see:

*   “Do both of the poems sound as though they have been written by the same narrator?”

*   “Do the details in both poems align?”

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   “What does align mean? What does it mean to make sure the details in both poems align?”

  • Listen for students to explain that it means to make sure the details line up between the two poems—there shouldn’t be any details that conflict or confuse the reader.
  • Tell students that they are going to be listening to the work of their peers for flow between the poems, focusing on whether it sounds as though they have been written by the same narrator and also whether there are any details that don’t match or might cause confusion between the two poems. Give the example that the “inside out” poem might suggest that the refugee has two younger sisters, whereas the “back again” poem might suggest that he/she has an older brother, which could confuse the reader and make the reader question how realistic and believable the two poems are.
  • Tell students that as they listen to students read their two poems, they are to consider the two questions that have been posted and also think of one question they could ask the writer to help him or her improve either the way it reads, so that it sounds more like one narrator, or to ensure that the details align.
  • Invite students to share their poems with the research teams.
  • Asking students to provide feedback to their peers based on explicit criteria benefits both students in clarifying the meaning of the learning target.

B. Writing Best Draft of “Inside Out” and “Back Again” Poems (20 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their Student-Friendly Performance Task Prompt and to reread the final paragraph of Part 2: Writing Free-Verse Narrative Poetry.
  • If computers are unavailable, distribute lined paper. Tell students that they are now going to write up the best drafts of their “inside out” and “back again” poems.
  • Remind students to refer to the feedback from mid and end of unit assessments, the stars and steps feedback from their peer critique in the previous lesson, feedback from the share with their research team, the “Inside Out” and “Back Again” Poetry Rubric, the What Makes an Effective Poem? anchor chart, and the revised drafts of their poems to write the best drafts of their “inside out” and “back again” poems.
  • Circulate around the room, addressing questions. Consider checking in first with students who need extra support to make sure they can use their time well.
  • When a few minutes are left, if students are working on computers, ask them to save their work.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Poetry Share with Someone from Another Research Team (7 minutes)

  • Ask students to pair up with someone from another research team. Distribute the Poetry Share Task Card.
  • Invite students to read the instructions with you.
  • Invite students to follow the directions to share their “inside out” and “back again” poems.
  • Refocus the whole group. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   “So what do you now know about refugees?”

*   “Where do they come from in terms of place?”

*   “When do they come from in terms of time?”

*   “What do you know about the possible emotional journey of refugees, as they turn ‘inside out’ and ‘back again’?”

  • Listen for students to explain that refugees come from all over the world and from different places in time and that they often turn “inside out” as they flee and find home and turn “back again” as they begin to adapt and settle in to life in their new country.
  • Be prepared for students to mention that perhaps not all refugees do turn “back again.” If this occurs, ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   “Why do you think some refugees do not turn ‘back again’?”

*   “From what you have read in the informational texts, how can we help refugees turn ‘back again’?”

  • Collect the “Inside Out” and “Back Again” poems and all of the student materials: Research Guide, poem organizers, and rough drafts of both poems.
  • Distribute Homework: Inside Out & Back Again Review.
  • Task cards support students who struggle with following multiple-step directions.

Assessment

None

Homework

Homework
  • Write a short review (no more than three paragraphs) of the novel Inside Out & Back Again for someone who is thinking about reading it. Answer these questions in your review:

–   What is the book about?

–   What did you think of the book? Why?

–   How effective was the use of poetry in conveying this particular refugee experience?

–   “Why do you think this author may have chosen to include both ‘inside out’ and ‘back again’?”

–   Would you recommend this book to someone? Why/why not?

Supporting Materials

None

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