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ELA G7:M2B:U1:L9

End of Unit Assessment: Claims, Interactions, and Structure in “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RI.7.1)
  • I can analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. (RI.7.3)
  • I can analyze the organization of an informational text (including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas). (RI.7.5)

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can cite evidence to support analysis of “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?”
  • I can analyze interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?”
  • I can analyze how paragraphs of “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?” contribute to the development of the ideas in the text. 
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Entry Task: Unpacking Learning Targets/Reviewing Vocabulary (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  End of Unit 1 Assessment (25 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Turn and Talk/Anchor Chart Development for Unit 2 (15 minutes)

4.  Homework

  1. Continue reading in your independent reading book for this unit. 
  • This lesson includes the End of Unit 1 Assessment, which assesses RI.7.1, RI.7.3, and RI.7.5.
  • In the text that students read for this assessment, there are three identified terms that they may not be familiar with. In order to accurately assess the skills included on the assessment and ensure there is no confusion over the meaning of these terms, the definitions should be posted for students to refer to during the assessment.
  • A 2 point rubric, based on the New York State rubric of the same name, is included for your reference when grading the short responses of the End Assessment.
  • In advance:

–   Post vocabulary terms and definitions:

  • make ends meet (page 1): to make enough money to cover one’s needs
  • excess (page 2): an amount beyond what is usual, needed, or asked
  • pang (page 2): a sudden sharp attack of pain or distress

–   Review “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?” Be aware that this text deals with financial issues to which students may be personally sensitive, especially with regard to how teens judge or treat other teens according to their financial status. Prompt students to “stick to the text” and stay objective, while honoring any connections students make. Point out if necessary that the text is not prescriptive (meaning that it is not advocating for certain behaviors), but rather simply reporting that they exist.

  • After the assessment, students refine and reflect their knowledge of identity by creating three more anchor charts that summarize their knowledge. The Identity Is chart asks students to create a final working definition of identity and can be regarded as the summative statement using the knowledge students have been gathering on the Identity anchor chart. The External Identity and Internal Identity charts ask students to recap, refine, and delineate that knowledge into external and internal identifiers, which will be a critical concept for analyzing the play Pygmalion in Unit 2. To keep things uncluttered, consider taking down the original Identity anchor chart after this lesson, after making sure the three new charts have captured all essential thinking.
  • Post: Learning targets, new anchor charts (see Work Time B).

Vocabulary

VocabularyMaterials

make ends meet, excess, pang

  • Vocabulary list for “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?” (one for display)
  • “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?” (assessment text; one per student)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Claims, Interactions, and Structure in “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?” (one per student)
  • Identity anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Identity anchor chart—student version (in identity journals; begun in Lesson 1)
  • Internal and External identity mind maps (from Lesson 1; one each per student)
  • Identity Is … anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Closing)
  • External Identity anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Closing)
  • Internal Identity anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Closing)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Claims, Interactions, and Structure in “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?” (answers, for teacher reference)
  • 2-Point Rubric: Short Response (for teacher reference) 

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Entry Task: Unpacking Learning Targets/Reviewing Vocabulary (5 minutes)

  • Tell students that today they get to demonstrate their progress on the learning targets:

*   “I can cite evidence to support analysis of ‘Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?’”

*   “I can analyze interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in ‘Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?’”

*   “I can analyze how paragraphs of ‘Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?’ contribute to the development of the ideas in the text.”

  • Assure students that there are no tricks to this assessment; it follows what they have been doing throughout the unit.
  • Refer to the posted vocabulary list for “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?” Tell students that these are three words or phrases they may not know. Have them look at the vocabulary while you read the words and definitions out loud.
  • Answer any clarifying questions about the three vocabulary terms.
  • Struggling readers may need help defining additional words. Encourage students to identify unfamiliar words and determine their meaning from context; provide them with the opportunity to check their predicted meanings. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment (25 minutes)

  • Distribute “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?” and the End of Unit 1 Assessment: Claims, Interactions, and Structure in “Is Money Affecting Your Social Status?” Remind students that they can and should refer to their texts as they complete the assessment. Tell them you will be concerned if you do not see them rereading as they complete the assessment.
  • Remind them that everyone needs to remain silent until the entire class is finished, and that this commitment is how they show respect for each other—it is non-negotiable. Write on the board: “If you finish early, you can …” and include suggestions they made in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 14, or any other tasks that suit the needs of your class.
  • Collect students’ assessments. Congratulate them on having completed the assessment. Point out students who showed positive test-taking strategies such as rereading the text, reading the questions several times, or crossing out answers they know are incorrect. 
  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding this assessment. 

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Turn and Talk/Anchor Chart Development for Unit 2 (15 minutes)

  • Ask students to turn and talk with a partner:

*   “How does this text relate to our working definition of identity?”

  • Conduct a whole-class “debrief” on the discussions pairs had. Add resulting insights to the Identity anchor chart and have students do the same on their Identity anchor chart—student version. Listen for comments that relate economic status to social status, such as: “How much money you have affects your relationships and the groups of people you hang out with, which then affects your identity” or “Your economic status can be embarrassing to you—you don’t want it to shape your identity.”
  • Congratulate students for having worked hard to complete a unit on a very interesting and complicated topic. Indicate that the class will use the next few minutes to summarize their learning on the charts.
  • Note that the charts will remain up for Unit 2, in which students will read a play about identity called Pygmalion.
  • Have students turn again to their Identity anchor chart—student version in their identity journals as you work with the posted Identity anchor chart. Have them look over their collected notes on the chart for a minute.
  • Remind students that in the beginning of the unit, they were asked to fill in a mind map of their internal and external identities. Give students a moment or two to get out their Internal and External identity mind maps from Lesson 1 and refresh their memories on what they wrote.
  • In groups of three or four, using the knowledge they have gained over the unit, have students complete the phrase “Identity is …” in no more than two sentences, attempting to summarize what they have learned. Acknowledge that this will be tricky, and that they need to steer clear of run-on sentences with multiple clauses.
  • Share out the sentences. Record them on the Identity Is … anchor chart, and then together as a class decide which one is the strongest. Circle it on the poster. Listen for sentences that incorporate the idea that identity is one’s sense of self, which can be affected by many social and personal factors. 
  • Now that the class has a summative working definition of identity, conduct a class discussion about which identity characteristics are internal, external, or both. Listen for and record such answers on the Internal and External Identity anchor charts: such as “language/speech”; “clothin”; self-worth”; “gender—.” (A specific answer may be recorded on both charts if the student has made a clearly reasoned case why).
  • Indicate to the students again that they will be referring to the charts as they go on in Unit 2.

Assessment

Homework

Homework
  • Continue reading in your independent reading book for this unit.

Note: The next lesson is a celebration of independent reading for the unit. Remind students to bring their independent reading books to class.

The return and review of the End of Unit Assessment is left up to the discretion of the teacher. Bear in mind, however, that the assessment should be returned within the next few days. The more quickly students receive feedback on their assessments, the more effective it is. 

Supporting Materials

None

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