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ELA G7:M2B:U1:L7

Analyzing Text Structure: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the central ideas of an informational text. (RI.7.2)
  • I can analyze the development of a central idea throughout the text. (RI.7.2)
  • I can analyze the organization of an informational text (including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas). (RI.7.5)

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can analyze the organization of “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” to determine the author’s claims and evidence.
  • I can analyze how the claims and evidence of “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” relate to one another. 
  • Reader’s Notes: “My Own True Name” (from homework)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?”
  • “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” Structure anchor chart.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Identity Journals and Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Listening for Gist: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (10 minutes)

     B.  Analyzing the Structure of the Text: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (1o minutes)

     C.  Reading Closely: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (13 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Forming Evidence-Based Claims: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (7 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Complete the Forming Evidence-Based Claims Graphic Organizer: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?”

     B.  Read your independent reading book for the unit at home. 

  • Lessons 7 and 8 are adapted from the Making Evidence-Based Claims unit developed by Odell Education. For the original Odell Education unit, go to www.odelleducation.com/resources.
  • In this lesson, students begin their work on RI.7.5: understanding how each section of the text contributes to the central claim. They begin to work with a graphic organizer that notes the reason in each part of the text and has a place to note how each section connects to the central claim of the text. Keep this as a class anchor chart and also provide students with their own copy to take notes. Note that in these lessons, the term “central claim” is used to refer to the overall claim of the text. As with any argument, the central claim is supported by a number of smaller claims that add together to create the central claim. The module refers to these smaller claims as “reasons,” since this language makes sense with these texts and also reflects the language used to delineate “claims” and “reasons” in the Common Core Writing Standards. In an argumentative essay, the central claim is established early. Note that this article follows suit; the central claim is stated clearly in the first paragraph.
  • In this lesson, students work with an introductory central text: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” The author examines slang from a linguistic perspective, making the argument that often slang words have important roles in spoken language. She also makes the argument that slang and other words act as social markers, determining “in” and “out” groups. This argument is an essential part of understanding the emphasis on language in Pygmalion in Unit 2.
  • This text is engaging but has several challenging words. Therefore, you first read the text aloud as students read it silently in their heads. Then they reread and analyze the selection in greater depth.
  • Note that since there is this initial read-aloud, the oral reading that usually accompanies text-dependent questions is removed. Therefore, this lesson includes just a teacher reference version of the text-dependent questions, rather than a full Close Reading Guide.
  • After students hear the text read aloud, they dive deeper into the text to analyze the author’s claims. They are given the central claim but must find evidence to support it.
  • Students hold their thinking by annotating their text. Because they may have little experience with annotating text, consider displaying your own copy of the text on a document camera and annotating it as you go to provide them with a visual model of what their text should look like. 
  • The homework for this lesson is the first time students are directed formally to read in their independent reading books. Based on the Unit 1 Overview and Lesson 1 teaching notes, it is assumed that you have used professional judgment in assigning independent reading up until this point. Refer back to the Unit 1 Overview for details. Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

VocabularyMaterials

structure, central claim, reason, section; “rush of steam,” innit, heinous, “hot under the collar,” fallacy, linguist, Anglo-Saxon, disassociated, quotative, appropriation, deploy, acronyms 

  • Identity journals (begun in Lesson 1; one per student)
  • “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (reformatted version, with wide margins for students to make annotations; one per student)
  • “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” Definitions (for teacher reference)
  • “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” Structure anchor chart (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Text-Dependent Questions: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (one per student)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (answers, for teacher reference)
  • “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” Structure anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (one per student)

Opening

Opening

A. Identity Journals and Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Have students open their identity journals to the Entry Task, Lesson 7, and complete it:

*   “What does the term self-worth mean to you? How is it different from being “stuck up” or “conceited”?”

*   “When someone has a sense of self-worth, what might it look like?”

*   “How can self-worth play a role in someone’s identity?”

  • Cold call two or three students for their answers. Listen for them to differentiate between having a strong sense of self-worth and having an inflated or inaccurate sense of one’s own strengths (conceit); also listen for them to identity self-worth as the means by which individuals value and cultivate their own identities. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Listening for Gist: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (10 minutes)

  • Distribute “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” Orient students to the text. Explain that the left margin is where they will take gist notes.
  • Next, direct their attention to the learning targets for the day. Point out that students will work with this text to notice what claims the author makes and how those claims are constructed. Ask students to raise their hands if they can define claim. When many of them have their hands up, call on one to give the definition.
  • Inform students that you will read this text aloud to them. As they listen to you and read silently in their heads, they should write down the gist of each paragraph. Remind them to write legibly and small. Assure them that you will pause so they will have time to jot down notes without missing the next part of the text, but they should feel free to underline words or phrases they think are important while you’re reading. (This text takes about 5 minutes to read aloud, not including pauses for student notes.)
  • Begin. At the end of Paragraph 3, pause and model writing the gist of the section. Consider saying something similar to:

*   “In Paragraph 1, I can see right away that the central claim has been made immediately. I’m going to write ‘CLAIM’ on the side and write the claim in my own words.”

  • Repeat this process for the whole text. After modeling a few times, ask different students to “think aloud” the gist notes. Make sure students are adding to their notes.
  • Define the vocabulary words listed under “vocabulary” for students as you read and have them jot down a brief definition of each on their texts. (See “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” Definitions (for teacher reference) in the supporting materials.) 
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes comprehension and fluency for students: They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that the students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Consider posting the list of definitions for this text so students may refer to it as they read. 

B. Analyzing the Structure of the Text: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (1o minutes)

  • Remind students that they talked about analysis in the first lesson, and that it means to take something apart or study it closely. Ask them what they think of when they hear the word structure, and listen for them to say: “building” or “something that has been built.” Tell them that when we talk about structure, we mean the way the parts work together to form a whole. A house has a structure; there are four walls that hold up a roof, plus doors and windows.
  • It is easy to see the structure of a house, but it is harder to see the structure of a text. Texts, like things that are built with hammers and nails, have structures. They are composed of a number of parts, and those parts fit together in a way to form a whole. For example, the first part of a book is often designed to grab your attention and introduce you to the characters. This is part of the structure of a text.
  • Tell students that understanding the overall purpose of what they are analyzing is an important part of understanding the structure. Offer the example of the house again: Once you know that the purpose of a house is to provide a comfortable place to live, you can figure out that the purpose of the door is to provide a way in, that the windows are to provide light, and that the roof is to keep out rain. Say:

*   “Once you understand the overall purpose of a text, it is much easier to analyze the parts that make it up and to understand the purpose of each section.”

  • Guide students to see that when we talk about the structure of a text, we often divide the text into sections, such as paragraphs or sets of paragraphs. Then we can ask questions such as:

*   “What is happening in this section?”

*   “What is the purpose of this section?”

*   “How does this one section contribute to or add to the text as a whole?”

  • Tell students that they will practice doing this with this text and the text in the next lesson, and that they will become very good at this skill. Later, they will show their ability to do this independently by tackling a new text.
  • Distribute the “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” Structure anchor chart and display a copy using a document camera. Ask students to find the overall purpose of the text and put their finger on it. When most have their fingers in the right place, ask a student to read the central claim out loud. Point out that the central claim is the argument the text is making; everything in the text is to convince the audience of its central claim. 
  • Point out that readers generally can’t say for sure what the central claim of a text is until they’ve read the whole thing, because it doesn’t always appear in the same place. To help students see the structure of the text, you are telling them the central claim, which you determined in the same way they will determine the reasons in various sections of the text.
  • Direct students to Paragraph 1 and point out that the claim is directly stated in the second sentence. Point out that this is right in the beginning. Ask if this is where they would expect a central claim to be.
  • Now ask students to find the part of the anchor chart that shows the first reason in the text and put their fingers on it. When most students have their fingers in the right place, call on someone to read it aloud.
  • Explain that identifying a reason, or the smaller claim developed in a section, is more than gist notes and less than a full summary. Display two poor examples: “filler words” and “Filler words have been used throughout history.” Ask:

*   “Why is ‘filler words’ not a good way to describe the reason of this section?”

Listen for: “It gives only a word or two to tell the topic.” Ask:

*   “Why is ‘Filler words have been used throughout history’ not a good way to describe the reason of this section?”

Listen for students to point out that this describes only the content of the paragraph, not the whole section.

  • Assure students that they will have a chance to analyze how you determined this reason, and then they will think about how it relates to the central claim. 
  • Careful attention to learning targets throughout a lesson engages, supports, and holds students accountable for their learning. Consider revisiting learning targets throughout the lesson so that students can connect their learning with the activity they are working on.
  • Using an analogy helps to make abstract concepts more accessible to students.
  • Consider writing these questions on the board for struggling learners who benefit from visuals to reinforce discussion.

C. Reading Closely: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (13 minutes)

  • Arrange students in pairs. Tell them they will now read the text closely with a partner to see how you determined the reason of this section and how this section relates to the central claim of the text.
  • Explain that, to help them understand this difficult text, they will read with some guiding questions. After they’ve discussed the questions, they will write their ideas on the left-hand side of the text, where they wrote their gist notes. You may want to remind them that they will be marking up this text a lot; they should write neatly and not too big so that their notes are legible. When students in high school and college read and think about texts, they often mark them up in this way.
  • Distribute the Text-Dependent Questions: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” Ask students to read along as you read the directions. Clarify any questions. Circulate to help as needed.
  • After 10 minutes, debrief students on the questions. Use the Text-Dependent Questions: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (answers, for teacher reference) as a guide.
  • Finally, direct students back to the Structure anchor chart. Ask them to turn and talk:

*   “How does each section connect to the overall claim?”

  • Use the “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” Structure anchor chart (for teacher reference) to guide students to an understanding of how each section of the text connects to the central claim. Add the explanation of how these sections connect to the central claim to the class anchor chart; prompt students to add it to their own copies.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Forming Evidence-Based Claims: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” (7 minutes)

  • Distribute the Forming Evidence-Based Claims Graphic Organizer: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?” You have given them the reasons, and they will be finding evidence.
  • Tell students that a writer chooses evidence to support his claim. Their task is to find four pieces of evidence in the text that support the reason in that section of the text. They can write direct quotes or paraphrase the information, but they should give the paragraph numbers.
  • Model the first one. Consider finding evidence for Reason 3, as it is a more challenging concept. You may do it yourself or consider asking a student to “think aloud” for a piece of evidence she noticed. 

Assessment

None

Homework

Homework
  • Complete the Forming Evidence-Based Claims Graphic Organizer: “Teen Slang: What’s, Like, So Wrong with Like?”
  • Read your independent reading book for the unit at home.

Supporting Materials

None

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