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ELA G7:M1:U3:L5

End of Unit 3 Assessment: Using Strong Evidence

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RL.7.1)
  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RI.7.1)
  • I can select evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.7.9)
  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to send a clear message to my reader. (L.7.2)

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can cite evidence to support my analysis of an informational text in the end of unit assessment. 
  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling in my two-voice poem. 

  • End of Unit 3 Assessment

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening 

A. Entry Task: Preparing for End of Unit 3 Assessment (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time 

A. End of Unit 3 Assessment (20 minutes)

B. Conventions in the Two-Voice Poem (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A. Review Learning Targets (10 minutes)

4.  Homework

A. Revise two-voice poem for conventions. Publish final draft of two-voice poem (type it or nicely rewrite it). Bring all two-voice poem work to turn in (Gathering Evidence graphic organizer, poem planner, final draft of the poem). 

B. Practice reading your poem aloud before you come back to class. Reading it to your family would be a great way to share your work with them.

  • The students will be referring to the model two-voice poem again in this lesson. If they have kept their previous copy, there is no need to make additional copies. 
  • Note it may be somewhat confusing to students that there is a “model” poem (an exemplar, used in most lessons) as well as a “sample” poem (which includes mistakes, and was used in Lesson 4 as an alternative to having a student volunteer share his/her work). In this lesson, students focus again on the model poem.
  • In advance: Consider setting up your room so that students feel like they are in a formal assessment environment. 

Vocabulary

VocabularyMaterials

cite, ellipses 

  • Entry task (one per student)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Using Strong Evidence (one per student)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Using Strong Evidence (Answers for Teacher Reference)
  • Document camera 
  • Model Two-Voice Poem: “I Would Do Anything” (from Unit 2, Lesson 17; one for display and one per student if needed)
  • Colored pencils

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Entry Task: Preparing for End of Unit 3 Assessment (5 minutes) 

  • As students enter the classroom, give them the entry task. Allow them 2 minutes to read it over and answer the questions individually. 
  • Ask students to turn to their seat partner and share their answers. 
  • Cold call one or two pairs to answer the first question: “What does it mean to use ‘strong evidence’ to support your analysis of a text?” Listen for: “It means using quotes from text that strongly support your ideas” or “It means choosing just the right evidence to support your ideas.” Clarify if necessary. 
  • Research indicates that cold calling improves student engagement and critical thinking. Be sure to prepare students for this strategy by discussing the purpose, giving appropriate think time, and indicating that this strategy will be used before students are asked questions. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 3 Assessment (20 minutes)

  • Tell students that today they get to demonstrate their progress on the learning target that was discussed earlier. Assure students that there are no tricks to this assessment; it really is exactly the same process they’ve been practicing in class in Unit 2 and in Unit 3, Lesson 1.
  • Tell students that everyone needs to remain silent until the entire class is finished, that this commitment is how they show respect for each other and is non-negotiable. Write on the board: “If you finish early, you can …” and include suggestions they made in Unit 1, Lesson 14. 
  • Distribute the End of Unit 3 Assessment: Using Strong Evidence to each student. 
  • Ask the class to complete the assessment.

  • For some students, this assessment may require more than the 20 minutes allotted. Consider providing time over multiple days if necessary.

B. Conventions in the Two-Voice Poem (10 minutes) 

  • Return to the entry task. Ask students to share with their seat partner what they think is challenging about using correct capitalization and punctuation in their poems. 
  • Call on one or two students to share their thoughts. 
  • Distribute the Model Two-Voice Poem: “I Would Do Anything” (from Unit 2, Lesson 17) and show it on the document camera. Tell students that they are going to look at the use of capitalization and punctuation in this poem. Explain that in two-voice poems, capitalization and punctuation are very important because they let the reader know where one thought begins and ends, even if one voice starts the idea and the other voice finishes it. 
  • Point to your copy of the poem and explain that the first complete sentence is the first line that begins with Uncle Jewiir and ends with Nya’s uncle: “Life challenges us here in Sudan.”
  • Explain that the author used ellipses to indicate that the sentence continues. Show students the period at the end of the sentence and explain that it shows the end of that thought. Next, point out the line that begins with: “Every year when the rains stopped and the pond near the village dried up” (26). Let students know that this sentence is complicated and the author had to make a choice. The reason it’s complicated is because the line “my people were forced to leave our village” is part of two different sentences. 

“Every year when the rains stopped and the pond near the village dried up” (26) my people were forced to leave our village to find water.

My people were forced to leave our village, running for our lives.” 

  • Explain that since it is the middle of one sentence and the beginning of another sentence, the author had to decide whether to capitalize “my.” She chose not to; in poetry, the author has the freedom to make a decision like that. 
  • Ask students to work with their seat partner to identify the complete sentences in the rest of the poem, underlining each sentence with a different colored pencil. 
  • The sentences are the following:

* “More than 4 million people were forced to flee their homes” (“Time Trip: Sudan’s Civil War”).

* “For my family, I would do anything.”

* “You only need to walk as far as those bushes, Salva.”(53)

* I will take opportunities “to create a future that might be different” (Water for South Sudan): a well, a refugee camp, a school.

* Tomorrow will be better than today for Nya.

* Tomorrow will be better than today for Salva.

  • As a class, review the sentences. Answer any questions the students may have about the way the model poem uses punctuation or capitalization. 
  • Many students will benefit from having the time available for this activity displayed via a timer or stopwatch.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Review Learning Targets (10 minutes) 

  • Reread the learning targets and focus particularly on the second one. Ask students to get out their two-voice poems and underline the complete ideas in their sentences in different colors. 

Assessment

ELA G7:M1:U3:L5

End-of-Unit Assessment

Homework

Homework
  • Revise your two-voice poem for conventions. Publish the final draft of the two-voice poem (type it or nicely rewrite it). Bring all two-voice poem work to turn in (Gathering Evidence graphic organizer, poem planner, final draft of the poem). 
  • Practice reading your poem aloud before you come back to class. Reading it to your family would be a great way to share your work with them.

Supporting Materials

None

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