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ELA G7:M1:U3:L2

Mid-Unit 3 Assessment and Planning the Two-Voice Poem

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.7.1)
  • I can determine the central ideas of informational text. (RL.7.2)
  • I can analyze the development of a central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RL.7.2)
  • I can objectively summarize informational text. (RL.7.2)
  • I can analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters and narrators in a literary text. (RL.7.6)
  • I can compare and contrast a fictional and historical account of a time, place, or character. (RL.7.9)
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.7.3)

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can explain how Park compares and contrasts Salva and Nya to convey ideas about how people survive in Sudan.
  • I can plan and write a two-voice poem that compares and contrasts Salva and Nya to convey my own ideas about how people survived in the challenging environment of South Sudan. 

  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A. Entry Task: Preparing for Assessment (5 minutes) 

2.  Work Time 

A. Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (20 minutes)

B. Preparing to Write Two-Voice Poem ( 10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket: What Is the Theme You Will Try to Convey in Your Poem? (10 minutes) 

4. Homework 

A. Find a book that has a map in it. You can look in our classroom library, the school library, your local library, or at home. Examine the map closely. Does it have a key? What are some of the physical features that are shown on the map?  

  • In Part A of Work Time, students demonstrate their ability to analyze how Park compares and contrasts Salva’s and Nya’s points of view, and how her juxtaposition of these two characters allows her to convey ideas about how people survive in Sudan. 
  • In Part B of Work Time, students shift from analyzing how Park used two characters to communicate her ideas to considering what ideas they as writers want to convey in their two-voice poem and planning for how they can use the two characters to do this.
  • The exit ticket, completed on the Two-Voice Poem: Gathering Evidence graphic organizer, is an important part of planning to write their two-voice poems. It will be helpful to review these to make sure students are on track to write focused, purposeful poems. You may want to note students who are struggling and pull them into a small group for extra support. These students may benefit from being assigned a theme. Also, if you have some special education staff who can help at this point, that might be useful for students who are really struggling.
  • In advance: Look over the Two-Voice Poem: Gathering Evidence graphic organizers that students turned in (Unit 2, Lesson 18 or 19). Review the students’ work to make sure all of them have successfully set a focus and gathered ideas for their poem. To help students prepare for the End of Unit 3 Assessment, consider providing them with specific feedback about how well their evidence from informational text matches the aspects of Salva’s and Nya’s stories they chose to focus on. Noticing which students have struggled to complete the graphic organizer may also guide your thinking about which ones may need additional support during the writing process.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

VocabularyMaterials

Do not preview vocabulary for the assessment task. 

  • Juxtaposition Practice handout (from Lesson 1)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Author’s Craft: Juxtaposition in A Long Walk to Water (one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Author’s Craft: Juxtaposition in A Long Walk to Water (Answers for Teacher Reference)
  • Two-Voice Poem: Gathering Evidence graphic organizer (from Unit 2, Lesson 17; with teacher feedback)
  • “Unexpected Links” homework (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Entry Task: Preparing for Assessment (5 minutes) 

  • As students enter, return the Juxtaposition Practice handouts from Lesson 1 with your comments on them. 
  • Focus comments for students who are struggling (students who are on track just need to know that).  Give them several minutes to review the feedback and discuss it with a partner. Consider using this time to confer briefly with a few students most in need of clarification.

  • Providing specific and focused feedback helps students set concrete goals for reaching learning targets.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (20 minutes)

  • Tell students that today they get to demonstrate their progress on the learning target that they practiced yesterday and that is posted today. Assure students that there are no tricks to this assessment; it really is exactly the same process they’ve been practicing in class in Unit 2 and in Unit 3, Lesson 1.
  • Distribute the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Author’s Craft: Juxtaposition in A Long Walk to Water to each student. Ask them to read through it carefully and follow these directions: 

Circle all of the items for which you will need to find textual evidence from the book or from your notes.

List materials or papers you will use in the assessment, and then get these out.

  • Answer any clarifying questions about the assessment. Tell students that everyone needs to remain silent until the entire class is finished, that this commitment is how they show respect for each other and it is non-negotiable. Write on the board: “If you finish early, you can …” and include suggestions they made in Unit 1 (Lesson 14). 
  • Students complete Mid-Unit 3 Assessment.
  • If students finish early, encourage them to continue with their independent reading book or to begin their homework. 

  •  If students receive accommodations for assessment, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment. 

B. Preparing to Write Two-Voice Poem (10 minutes) 

  • Congratulate students on the mastery they have just shown on the assessment and explain that for the rest of the lessons, they will be thinking about their own writing and the choices they will make as writers. Just as Park had a purpose for which she juxtaposed two characters, so they also need a purpose for their writing. 
  • Return the Two-Voice Poem: Gathering Evidence graphic organizers and give students a few minutes to quietly review your feedback. Tell them that they will be doing an assessment in a few lessons on their ability to select evidence from informational text to support a theme, and the feedback on this graphic organizer will let them know how they are doing with this skill.
  • Tell students that writers often play with several ideas before they generate their writing plans, and that they often talk over their ideas. Today, they will do a short protocol to help them explore possibilities and think about what will make their poems most compelling.
  • Use the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol with these questions:

* What is the most important factor in survival on your chart? Why is it important? Star it.

* What big idea do you want your readers to understand about that survival factor? How will you use Salva’s and Nya’s points of view to communicate this?

* What would be a compelling detail or scene with which to start your poem? Write a #1 next to it. Why would it be a good place to start?

  • The Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face discussion activity acts as a physical and mental release for students’ focus after the mid-unit assessment. Ensuring that students have opportunities to incorporate physical movement in the classroom supports their academic success. This closing activity is meant to help students synthesize their current understanding of the characters in the novel in a low-stakes structure.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: What Is the Theme You Will Try to Convey in Your Poem? (10 minutes) 

  • Direct students to follow the process below to capture their thinking on their Two-Voice Poem: Gathering Evidence graphic organizer.

At the top of your graphic organizer, write: The big idea about survival I want my poem to convey is ____________. 

Complete the sentence, explaining the main idea you want your poem to convey about survival.

On the Two-Voice Poem: Gathering Evidence graphic organizer, star the details from each column that will be most helpful to you in conveying this idea.

  • To provide visual support, consider posting these directions on the board.
  • Consider collecting the Two-Voice Poem: Gathering Evidence graphic organizer to make sure that all students have a clear main idea for their poem and to guide your decisions about who may need additional support during the writing process.

Assessment

Homework

Homework
  • Find a book that has a map in it. You can look in our classroom library, the school library, your local library, or at home. Examine the map closely. Does it have a key? What are some of the physical features that are shown on the map?  

Supporting Materials

None

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