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ELA G7:M1:U2:L8

World Café to Analyze Theme and Character in A Long Walk to Water (Chapters 16–18)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about seventh-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL 7.1)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L 7.4) 
  • I can analyze the development of a theme throughout a literary text. (RL.7.2)
  • I can analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters and narrators in a literary text. (RL.7.6)

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with my classmates about our reading.
  • I can explain how comparing and contrasting Salva’s and Nya’s points of view in the second part of the novel helps Park convey ideas about how people in Sudan survive.
  • I can explain the physical and emotional factors that helped Nya and Salva to survive in A Long Walk to Water.

  • Reader’s Notes from Chapters 16-18 (from Lesson 6 homework)
  • Gathering Textual Evidence graphic organizer for Chapters 14-18 (from Lesson 6 homework)
  • World Café charts

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A. Vocabulary Entry Task (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Reader’s Dictionary and Adding to Salva/Nya Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time 

A. World Café (25 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A. Previewing Water for South Sudan Homework Assignment (10 minutes)

4.  Homework

A. Water for South Sudan Homework Assignment: read informational text and answer text-dependent and vocabulary questions.

  • This lesson serves as a culminating discussion of A Long Walk to Water. This lesson uses the same World Café protocol that students were introduced to in Unit 1, Lesson 9. 
  • The specific discussion questions in the World Café are designed to help students synthesize their thinking around questions that have been of continuing importance: the factors that allowed Salva and Nya to survive, and the ways the author compares and contrasts Salva and Nya in order to convey ideas about how people survive in Sudan. The Opening routines have been condensed to provide more time for the discussion and to allow an in-depth preview of the homework assignment.
  • The homework assignment is the text that will be used for the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment of RL.7.9. The text is from the website of Salva’s organization, Water for South Sudan, and this lesson includes time to show students the website and a video on it. This will help them more clearly understand the process of drilling a well, generate enthusiasm for the reading assignment, and provide an opportunity to discuss the purpose of the text they will read. The homework assignment is excerpts from the website.
  • In advance: Review Chapters 16–18 of A Long Walk to Water
  • Review the World Café protocol (embedded in this lesson; also in Unit 1, Lesson 9).
  • Decide if you would like to collect the Reader’s Notes and Gathering Textual Evidence graphic organizer for the whole novel in order to assess students’ work. If so, plan to do so in this lesson. Students may want to refer to their Reader’s Notes in Lesson 9, and they will need to use both documents daily in class beginning in Lesson 10.
  • Go to www.waterforsouthsudan.org and explore the website. You will share this with students in preparation for their homework assignment. This lesson suggests a particular video, but you may find that another video or section of the website more precisely matches your students’ needs or interests.
  • Prepare necessary technology to show the video. 
  • Post: learning targets, entry task, Salva/Nya anchor chart, Survival anchor chart.
  • Before teaching this lesson, review the Unit 3 mid-unit assessment. In your conversation with students, try to avoid specific discussion of those examples of juxtaposition. (Both are from chapters 17 and 18: Salva’s step by step work to start his organization juxtaposed with Nya’s village’s step by step change because of the well; Nya’s joy in going to school juxtaposed with Salva’s joy in finding his father.) 

Vocabulary

VocabularyMaterials

compare, contrast, point of view, juxtaposition; bewildering (98), destruction (99), aid organization (100), relief agency (100), remote (100), clinic (100), contaminated (106)

  • Vocabulary Entry Task (one per student)
  • Salva/Nya anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Survival anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Survival anchor chart (Student’s Notes; begun in Lesson 1)
  • World Café materials/setup: 
  1. World Café protocol directions (one for document projector or charted on board) 
  2. Classroom divided into three sections, with each having enough room for one-third of the class to sit at tables in small groups of three (triads)
  3. Table card prompts (with tables in each section having the same question and each section having a different question)
  4. One recording chart for each triad 
  5. A marker for each triad
  • Computer and means of displaying the screen
  • Water for South Sudan homework assignment (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Vocabulary Entry Task (5 minutes)

  • Post the Vocabulary Entry Task in advance:

* “What do aid organizations and relief agencies do?” (page 100) 

* “Why might they be involved in South Sudan?”

  • While students work, check their homework (Reader’s Notes for Chapters 16–18 and Gathering Textual Evidence graphic organizer for Chapters 14–18). 
  • When students are finished, cold call several of them to share their thinking.
  • Congratulate the class on finishing the novel. Tell them that today they will have the chance to talk with many of their classmates about what happened in the last part of the book, and that you are looking forward to hearing their thinking.
  • Help students reflect on their progress on standard L.7.4: “I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases.” 
  • Ask students to turn and talk: 

* “How has your ability to determine the meaning of words you encounter when you’re reading improved in
the past several weeks?” 

* “What is one thing you can do now in terms of figuring out the meaning of unknown words that you could
not do a few weeks ago?”

  • Ask several students to share their growth. Celebrate class progress with this skill and point out that their willingness to both think hard on their own and to tackle these questions collaboratively is making them stronger readers. Ask students to consider another class or time that they might use this skill. Call on several to share. 

B. Reviewing Reader’s Dictionary and Adding to Salva/Nya Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

  • Post definitions from Chapters 16–18 and ask students to review their dictionaries and correct as necessary.
  • Select one pair of students to use their Reader’s Notes to add to the Salva/Nya anchor chart. Other pairs use their Reader’s Notes to find ideas to add to the Survival anchor chart. Cold call pairs of students to add to the Survival anchor chart without elaboration. Direct students to use the Salva/Nya anchor chart to make sure their Reader’s Notes are accurate and complete. Prompt students to update their Survival anchor chart (Student’s Notes).
  • Ask students: 

* “How did keeping this dictionary help you learn about Salva and Nya? About the world? About the theme of survival?”

  • As time permits, invite a few volunteers to share out. Emphasize that building one’s vocabulary is a powerful way to learn more about the world and enables students to apply this learning in their own writing, which they will do later in the unit. 

Developing self-assessment and reflection supports all learners, but research shows it helps struggling learners most.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. World Café (25 minutes)

  • Ask students to raise their hand in response to this question:

* Who was surprised by the book’s ending?”

  • Do not explain that Salva and Nya meet at the end of the book—leave that for students to articulate in the World Café protocol. Tell students that today they will have the chance to talk about the end of the book. 
  • Remind students that they are becoming stronger readers both through the reading and thinking they are doing on their own, as well as through their conversations with each other. In Unit 1, they used the World Café protocol to talk about the first part of the book. Today they will use the same protocol to deepen their understanding of the two characters’ points of view and the theme of survival. 
  • Direct students’ attention to the learning target: 

* “I can effectively engage in discussions with my classmates about our reading.” 

  • Ask: 

* “What can you do to make sure your conversations help everyone think more deeply about the book? When you have thought of two things, raise your hand.” 

  • Wait until most of the class has a hand up, and then call on several students to share their thinking.
  • Note: Directions for the World Café protocol follow. They are almost identical to the directions in Unit 1, Lesson 9, except that teachers offer specific praise for strong discussions (instead of smooth transitions). 
  • In case you don’t need to read the whole protocol again, the questions are listed here. When teaching this lesson, first review the protocol with students and then share the discussion questions.
  • Below are the three main questions, and related probing questions, for the World Café (see also supporting materials). 

1.  What do we learn about Salva as a leader in Chapter 13?

(Who is he leading as a boy? As an adult?)

(What makes him an effective leader?)

2.  How does the author juxtapose Salva and Nya in the final chapters of the novel?

(How has Salva’s point of view about the Nuer changed?)
(How has Nya’s point of view about the Dinka changed?)
(What does this help us understand about what might help people survive in Sudan?) 

3.  What are the physical and emotional resources that enable Salva and Nya to survive?

(What do you think the author’s opinion is about which type of resource is more important for survival? What makes you say that?) 

(What is your opinion about which type of resource is more important for survival? Why?)

Directions for the World Café follow. 

  • Ask students to take out their text, A Long Walk to Water, as well as their Reader’s Notes and Gathering Textual Evidence graphic organizer for Chapters 6–18. 
  • Arrange students into triads, with each triad sitting at a table with materials for the World Café: recording chart, a marker, and one table card prompt (see Materials at the end of this lesson).
  • Display the World Café protocol directions on the document camera or on a chart. Briefly review the protocol directions. 
  • Remind students that they have done this protocol once before, in Unit 1. Remind them that it will feel fast-paced at first, because it’s designed to give every student a chance to think for a little bit about each question. Caution students that you will interrupt their conversations, but they’ll have a chance to keep working with their ideas at the end of the activity. Review the simple signal you will use to indicate when each round is done (e.g., raising hands, clapping). 

Round I: 

  • Ask each triad to choose a student to be the “Recorder” for the first round. The Recorder will write down ideas from the group’s conversation on the recording chart at the table. Ask all groups to have their Recorder raise his or her hand.
  • Remind students to use their Reader’s Notes, Gathering Textual Evidence graphic organizers, and the novel to support their discussions. Remind them of the goals they set in the opening part of class about conversations that deepen everyone’s understanding of the book.
  • Focus students on the question on their table card prompts. Ask them to read the question aloud and then discuss that question. Ask the Recorder to take notes on the table’s recording chart. Remind Recorders to make their letters about 1 inch in height so that their writing will be visible when posted at the end of the activity.
  • After 3 minutes, use the signal to get students’ attention. Explain the transition that they will do momentarily: 
  1. The Recorders will stay seated at the table where they have been working. 
  2. The other pair of students in each triad will stand and rotate together to the table in the next section with different table card prompts.
  • Signal students to transition quickly and quietly.

Round II:

  • Give specific positive praise for strong discussions—e.g., text-based, focused on the question, building on each other’s ideas, asking each other questions.
  • Be sure that the Round I Recorder has remained at his/her original table. Tell the class the following three steps, then prompt them to begin: 
  1. The Round I Recorder summarizes the conversation that happened at that table during Round I. 
  2. Choose a new Round II Recorder from the new students at the table. 
  3. The new group reads the question on their table card prompt, then begins a discussion about that question. 
  • Remind students to use their Reader’s Notes, Gathering Evidence graphic organizers, and the novel to support their discussions. Prompt the Round II Recorder to take notes on the table’s recording chart. Remind Recorders to make their letters about 1 inch in height so that their writing will be visible when posted at the end of the activity.
  • After 3 minutes, use the signal to get students’ attention. Remind them of the transition:
  1. Round II Recorders will stay seated at the table where they have been working. 
  2. The other pair of students in each triad will stand and rotate together to the table in the next section with different table card prompts.
  • Signal the transition to Round III. 

Round III:

  • Repeat the process from Round II. 
  • Be sure that the Round II Recorder has remained at his/her Round II table. Review the three steps, then prompt them to begin: 
  1. The Round II Recorder summarizes the conversation that happened at that table during Round I. 
  2. Choose a new Round III Recorder from the new students at the table. 
  3. The new group reads the question on their table card prompt, then begins a discussion about that question.
  • Remind them to use their Reader’s Notes, Gathering Evidence graphic organizers, and the novel to support their discussions. Prompt the new Recorder to take notes on the table’s recording chart. Remind Recorders to make their letters about 1 inch in height so that their writing will be visible when posted at the end of the activity.
  • After 3 minutes, use the signal to get students’ attention. Remind them of the transition:
  1. Round III Recorders will stay seated at the table where they have been working. 
  2. The other pair of students in each triad will stand and rotate together to the table in the next section with different table card prompts.

  • Use of protocols (like World Café) allows for total participation of students. It encourages critical thinking, collaboration, and social construction of knowledge. It also helps students practice their speaking and listening skills.
  • The World Café protocol can be difficult to explain through written instructions and visual cues. Students benefit from guided promptsalong the way, in particular providing kinesthetic cues to orient them to the steps of the World Café.
  • This discussion protocol intentionally moves at a fast pace. This is because students will be rotating through a series of three questions, so classmates are often just reiterating the ideas that others have recorded in a previous round.
  • Because students will be interrupted in the midst of the World Café protocol, it’s important to remind them of an agreed-upon signal that you will use to respectfully get their attention. If such a signal is not already in use in the classroom, consider using a combination of a visual and auditory signal, such as a chime and hand-raising.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Previewing Water for Sudan Homework Assignment (10 minutes) 

  • Display the following website on a screen: www.waterforsouthsudan.org. Share with students that this is the website for the organization that Salva Dut founded, Water for South Sudan (also called Water for Sudan). Tell students that the purpose of this website is both to inform people about the organization’s work and to advocate for its importance. Define advocate: to publicly call for something. For example, “The student government advocated for another dance.” 
  • Turn and talk: 

* “Given the website’s purpose to inform and advocate, what types of information might it include? What might it not include?” 

  • Call on several students to share their thinking, making sure that the class understands that the website will argue that this work is very important and that this organization is very effective. It is not likely to explain problems with the organization. 
  • Tell students that tonight for homework, they will read a few pages from this website, which will be the basis of an assessment the following day. They are welcome to dig around on the website at home in addition to doing their homework. It features many videos and stories that relate to the novel that they might find interesting.
  • Show students a short video (this one focuses on the actual process of drilling for water): http://waterforsudan.org/drilling-in-south-sudan/
  • Turn and talk: “What did you learn from this video that you did not learn from the novel?”
  • Distribute out Water for South Sudan homework and make sure students understand the task.
  • Exploring this website serves to build students’ background knowledge about Sudan. This is a place many of them have never been, with circumstances beyond most of their experiences. Seeing this place and these people on video improves engagement and builds important foundational knowledge.

Assessment

None

Homework

Homework
  • Tonight, you will learn about the organization that Salva Dut began, called Water for South Sudan. The organization’s website is at www.waterforsouthsudan.org. Your homework is to read parts of the website (printed out) and answer the questions. We will be discussing these texts tomorrow and using them for an assessment.

Supporting Materials

None

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