You are here

ELA G6:M1:U3:L7

End of Unit Assessment—Final Draft of Hero’s Journey Narrative

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.6.3)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can use transitional words and phrases to move my story from one moment to the next.
  • I can use my draft to write a final, best version of my hero’s journey narrative.
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Final Draft of Hero’s Journey Narrative

 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking the Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.   Work Time

A.  Mini Lesson: Using Transitions to Show Shifts in Time and Place (10 minutes)

B.  Revising Hero’s Journey Narrative for Strong Transitions (5 minutes)

C.  Final Draft of Hero’s Journey (25 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Fist to Five: How Well Does Your Hero’s Journey Narrative Follow the Hero’s Journey Archetype? (3 minutes)

4.   Homework

A.  Finish up the final draft of your hero’s journey story.
Independent reading.

  • In this lesson, students analyze the model narrative, “The Golden Key,” for use of transitional words and phrases against a list of transitional words and phrases on the Transitions to Show Time and Place handout. They synthesize this learning by considering how the use of transitional words and phrases improves the reader’s understanding of the narrative.
  • Students then apply this learning to their draft before writing up a final, best draft of their hero’s journey narrative.
  • As in Lessons 4–6, consider the setup of the classroom; if possible, students can work on computers.
  • If students did not use computers to draft their essays in Lesson 4, consider giving them more time to revise and rewrite their essays.
  • Have independent activities ready for students who finish their revisions early.
  • Not all students will finish their revisions during this class. Have students email their files, check out a computer, or come in during an off period or after school to finish. Consider extending the due date for students who do not have access to a computer at home.
  • Use the My Hero’s Journey Narrative Writing Rubric to assess student work.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

VocabularyMaterials

transitional words and phrases

 

  • Transitions to Show Time and Place (one per student; one for display)
  • Model narrative: “The Golden Key” (from Lesson 2; one per student)
  • Highlighters (one per student)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Final Draft of Hero’s Journey Narrative (one per student)
  • Lined paper (two per student)
  • My Hero’s Journey Narrative Writing Rubric (For Teacher Reference; use this to score students’ assessments)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Independent Reading Review (5 minutes)

  • Invite the class to read the learning targets with you:

*   “I can use transitional words and phrases to move my story from one moment to the next.”

*   “I can use my draft to write a final, best version of my hero’s journey narrative.”

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   “What are transitional words and phrases?”

  • Listen for: “Words that move one sentence or paragraph smoothly into the next sentence or paragraph.”
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Careful attention to learning targets throughout a lesson engages, supports, and holds students accountable for their learning. Consider revisiting learning targets throughout the lesson so that students can connect their learning with the activity they are working on.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: Using Transitions to Show Shifts in Time and Place (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that you have been reading their draft narratives as they have been writing in lessons and you have noticed that they need some practice using transitions to show shifts in time and place.
  • Display and distribute Transitions to Show Time and Place. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   “What do you notice?”

*   “What do you wonder?”

  • Invite students to read the definition of transitions at the top of the handout with you. Remind them that transitional words and phrases guide the reader through the changes of time and place in stories.
  • Invite students to read the headings of the two columns with you and ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

*   “What are the differences between the two columns?”

  • Listen for: “The column on the left is about time, and the column on the right is about space.”
  • Give the class a couple of minutes to silently read through the words on the handout. Tell students that there are more transitional words and phrases than listed on this handout, but these are most commonly used.
  • Tell students that they are going to work in triads to analyze the use of transitional words and phrases in the model narrative, “The Golden Key.”
  • Invite them to Think-Pair-Share:

*   “Where do you think you will find most of the transitional words and phrases in ‘The Golden Key’? Why?”

  • Listen for: “At the end and beginning of paragraphs and at the end and beginning of sentences, because transitions often signify moving from one sentence to another or from one paragraph to another as the narrative moves forward in time or to a different place.”
  • Distribute a highlighter to each student. Tell triads to use their Transitions to Show Time and Place handout to discuss and highlight the transitional words and phrases in “The Golden Key.” Remind students that some of the transitional words and phrases in “The Golden Key” may not be on their handout, but they should be able to recognize them by considering whether the words or phrases between sentences and paragraphs show movement forward in time or movement to a different place.
  • Refocus the group. Display “The Golden Key” and tell students that you are going to read through the narrative aloud. They are to interrupt you when they think there is a transitional word or phrase. Highlight the transitional words and phrases students suggest.
  • Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:
  • “How do transitional words and phrases help the reader understand the narrative better?”

*   Listen for: “They make it flow smoothly and signal to readers where they are in time and space.”

  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially those who are challenged.

B.  Revising Hero’s Journey Narrative for Strong Transitions (5 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have seen how transitional words and phrases can be used to make a narrative flow smoothly across time and space and to signal to readers where they are in time and space, they are going to apply this to their draft hero’s journey narratives.
  • Give students 5 minutes to do this and remind them to refer to their Transitions to Show Time and Place handout when choosing transitional words and phrases for their narrative.

C. Final Draft of Hero’s Journey (25 minutes)

  • Congratulate the students on completing the draft of their hero’s journey narrative. Tell students that they now have 25 minutes to write up the final draft of their narratives. Remind students that a final draft is the final, best version that you will be assessing.
  • Display and distribute the End of Unit 3 Assessment: Final Draft of Hero’s Journey Narrative.
  • If not using computers, distribute lined paper. Remind students that because this is an assessment, they are to work independently. As students work, circulate to observe or provide feedback as needed.
  • Collect students’ final drafts. If they need more time, invite them to finish at home for homework.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Fist to Five: How Well Does Your Hero’s Journey Narrative Follow the Hero’s Journey Archetype? (3 minutes)

  • Give students a minute to consider this question:

*   “How well does your hero’s journey narrative follow the hero’s journey archetype?”

  • Ask them to show a fist for “not at all” and five for “it follows the archetype perfectly.” Summarize for the students what you see. For example: “I am so pleased to see that most of you think that your hero’s journey stories follow the archetype closely. Great job, everyone!”
  • Make a mental note of those students who have raised two or fewer fingers and take the time to look over their stories with them to identify any issues or areas of misunderstanding.
  • Use of protocols (like Fist to Five) allows for total participation of students.
  • Developing self-assessment and reflection supports all learners, but research shows it supports struggling learners most.

Assessment

None

Homework

Homework
  • Finish up the final draft of your hero’s journey story.
  • Independent reading.

 

Note: At the beginning of the next lesson, collect the final drafts that students take home to finish. If some students are finished collect their narratives now in order to begin grading.  Use the rubric in the supporting materials of this lesson to help guide you.

Supporting Materials

None

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up