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ELA G5:M1

Stories of Human Rights

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The Foundational Reading and Language Standards Resources Package for Grades 3–5

Use this guide to build additional literacy blocks alongside the module lessons.

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What are human rights, and how do real people and fictional characters respond when those rights are challenged? Students will develop their ability to read and understand complex text as they consider this question. Students will begin to build knowledge about human rights through a close read of the introduction and selected articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), paired with short firsthand accounts of people around the world who currently face human rights challenges.

In Unit 2, students will do an extended study of Esperanza Rising (740L) by Pam Muñoz Ryan, applying their new learning about human rights as one lens through which to interpret the character and theme in this rich novel—a complex coming-of-age story set in Mexico and rural California during the early 1930s. Through close reading, interpretation, and analysis of fiction and nonfiction texts, students will synthesize their understanding of human rights. The specific literacy focus is on supporting understanding through quoting directly from text, inferring theme, and comparing and contrasting how different texts address the topics and themes of human rights. Students will write an analytical essay in which they describe how a character in the novel responds to challenges.

In Unit 3, students will continue to revisit the text and themes of the UDHR and Esperanza Rising as they read, write, and ultimately perform Readers Theater. Students will compare novels and Readers Theater as two forms of narrative writing. They will then select specific articles of the UDHR that relate thematically to the novel and reread key passages of the novel with that theme in mind. They will write individual and small group scripts based on these key passages and on phrases from the UDHR. Students will revise, rehearse, and ultimately perform their group Readers Theater scripts for their class and/or school or community members. This performance task centers on ELA standards W.5.3, W.5.4, W.5.5, and W.5.11.

Week-at-a-Glance

Each module is approximately 8 weeks of instruction broken into 3 units. The "week at a glance" chart in the curriculum map gives the big picture, breaking down the module into a detailed week-by-week view. It shows how the module unfolds, the focus of each week of instruction, and where the six assessments and the performance task occur.

Big Ideas & Guiding Questions

  • What are human rights?
  • What lessons can we learn about human rights through literature and life?
  • How can we tell powerful stories about people’s experiences? 
  • We learn lessons about human rights from the experiences of real people and fictional characters.
  • Characters change over time in response to challenges.
  • People respond differently to similar events in their lives.
  • Authors conduct research and use specific language in order to impact their readers.

Content Connections

  • This module is designed to address English Language Arts standards and to be taught during the literacy block of the school day. However, the module intentionally incorporates Social Studies and Science content that may align to additional teaching during other parts of the day. These intentional connections are described below.

Texts

Texts to Buy

Texts that need to be procured. Please download the Trade Book List for procurement guidance.


Cover Text Quantity ISBNs
Esperanza Rising
by Pam Muñoz Ryan
One Per Student
ISBN: 978-0439120425, 043912042x

Texts included in the module

Texts that are included in the lesson materials.

Cover Text Quantity Publisher
A Short History of the UDHR
by Nancy Flowers
Background on the UDHR
by Nancy Flowers
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
by excerpts only
Readers Theater Grade 5
by Michael Ryall
Fluency Practice Read-Aloud Plays
by Kathleen M. Hollenbeck
“Readers Theater Script: American Heroes”
by Unknown
“The History of the United Nations" Excerpt
by Human Rights Resource Center
“From Kosovo to the United States”
by Isau Ajeti and Blanche Gosselin
Skipping Stones, 2004
“Teaching Nepalis to Read, Plant, and Vote,”
by Lesley Reed
Faces 21, 2005
Readers On Stage
by Aaron Shepard
Shepard Publications, 2004
ISBN: 978-0-938497-21-9

Outcomes

CCSS Standards Assessed in This Module: Reading—LiteratureLong-Term Learning Targets
  • RL.5.1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text.
  • I can make inferences using quotes from text.
  • RL.5.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the text.
  • I can summarize a literary text
  • RL.5.3. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text (two or more characters’ points of view, settings, events).
  • RL.5.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in text.
  • RL.5.5. Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
  • I can explain how a series of chapters, scenes of stanzas fit together to create a larger literary text.
  • RL.5.6. Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.
  • I can describe how a narrator’s point of view influences the description of events
  • RL.5.9. Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.
  • I can compare and contrast stories in the same genre for approach to theme and topic.
  • RL.5.11 Recognize, interpret, and make connections in narratives, poetry and drama, to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, eras, personal events, and situations. 
  • I can make connections between texts and ideas to comprehend what I read (RL.5.11)
CCSS Standards Assessed in This Module: Reading—Informational TextLong-Term Learning Targets
  • RI.5.1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text.
  • I can make inferences using quotes from the text.
  • RI.5.2. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details.
  • I can summarize an informational text.
  • RI.5.3. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
  • I can explain important connections between people, events, or ideas in a historical, scientific, or technical text accurately.
  • I can support my explanation using specific details in the text.
  • RI.5.4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
  • I can determine the meaning of academic words or phrases in an informational text.
  • I can determine the meaning of content words or phrases in an informational text.
  • RI.5.9. Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgably.
  • I can accurately synthesize information from multiple texts on the same topic.
CCSS Standards Assessed in This Module: Reading—Foundational SkillsLong-Term Learning Targets

RF.5.4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

  • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
  • Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression.
  • Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
  • I can read fifth-grade level texts accurately and fluently to make meaning.
  • I can read fifth-grade texts with purpose and understanding.
  • I can read fifth-grade texts with fluency.
  • I can use clues in the text to check my accuracy.
  • I can reread to make sure that what I’m reading makes sense.
CCSS Standards Assessed in This Module: WritingLong-Term Learning Targets
  • W.5.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
  • Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).
  • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
  • I can use the 6+1 traits to write informative/explanatory texts.
  • I can write an informative/explanatory text that has a clear topic.
  • I can group supporting facts together about a topic in an informative/explanatory text. 
  • I can use text, formatting, illustrations, and multi-media to support my topic.
  • I can develop the topic with facts, definitions, details, and quotations.
  • I can use linking words and phrases to connect ideas within categories of information (e.g., in contrast, especially).
  • I can use contextually specific language/vocabulary to inform or explain about a topic.
  • I can construct a concluding statement or section of an informative/explanatory text.

W.5.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

  • Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
  • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
  • Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.
  • Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
  • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
  • I can use the 6+1 traits to write narrative texts.
  • I can introduce the narrator/characters of my narrative.
  • I can organize events in an order that makes sense in my narrative.
  • I can use dialogue and descriptions to show the actions, thoughts, and feelings of my characters.
  • I can use transitional words, phrases, and clauses to show passage of time in a narrative text.
  • I can use sensory details to describe experiences and events precisely.
  • I can write a conclusion to my narrative.

W.5.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.5.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

  • I can use the writing process to produce clear and coherent writing (with support).

W.5.8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.

  • I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories.

W.5.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • I can write for a variety of reasons.
CCSS Standards Assessed in This Module: Speaking and ListeningLong-Term Learning Targets

SL.5.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

  • Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
  • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
  • Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.
  • Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions.
  • I can effectively engage in a discussion with my peers.
  • I can prepare myself to participate in discussions. 
  • I can follow our crew norms when I participate in a conversation.
  • I can ask questions so I’m clear about what is being discussed.
  • I can connect my questions to what others say.
  • I can explain what I understand about the topic being discussed.

SL.5.2. Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

  • I can adapt my speech for a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate.
CCSS Standards Assessed in This Module: LanguageLong-Term Learning Targets

L.5.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  • Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.
  • Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.
  • Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.
  • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.
  • Use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor).
  • I can use conventions to send a clear message to my reader.
  • I can what conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections are and how they’re used in sentences.
  • I can use the perfect verb tenses. (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked)

• I can use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and
conditions.
• I can identify an inappropriate shift in verb tense.
• I can correct an inappropriate shift in verb tense.
• I can use correlative conjunctions. (e.g., either/or, neither/nor)

L.5.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

  • Use punctuation to separate items in a series.
  • Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence.
  • Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?), and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).
  • Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.
  • Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.
  • I can use conventions to send a clear message to my reader.
  • I can use punctuation to separate items in a series.
  • I can use a comma to separate an introductory word or phrase from the rest of the sentence.
  • I can use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you).
  • I can use a comma to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?).
  • I can use a comma to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).
  • I can use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.
  •  I can spell grade-appropriate words correctly.
  •  I can consult reference materials to check and correct my spelling.

L.5.3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

  • Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.
  • Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems.
  • I can my knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
  • I can use a variety of sentence structures in my writing.
  • I can compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in different kinds of texts (e.g., stories, dramas, poems).

L.5.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

  • Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  • Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis).
  • Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.
  • I can use a variety of strategies to read grade appropriate words and phrases I don’t know.
  • I can use what the text says (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) to help me understand the meaning of a word or phrase.
  • I can use common Greek and Latin affixes (prefixes) and roots as clues to help me know what a word means. (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis)
  • I can use resource materials (glossaries, dictionaries, thesauruses) to help me determine or clarify the pronunciation and meaning of key words and phrases.

L.5.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

  • Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context.
  • Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.
  • Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words.
  • I can analyze the meaning of figurative language.
  • I can interpret the meaning of simple similes in context.
  • I can interpret the meaning of simple metaphors in context.
  • I can explain the meaning of common idioms.
  • I can explain the meaning of common adages.

• I can explain the meaning of common proverbs.
• I can use relationships between words (synonyms, antonyms, and
homographs) to help me understand words.

L.5.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal contrast, addition, and other logical relationships (e.g., however, although, nevertheless, similarly, moreover, in addition).

  • I can accurately use fifth-grade academic vocabulary to express my ideas.

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