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ELA G4:M4

Susan B. Anthony, the Suffrage Movement, and the Importance of Voting

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The Foundational Reading and Language Standards Resources Package for Grades 3–5

Use this guide to build additional literacy blocks alongside the module lessons.

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In this module, students will read, write, and speak about the topic of voting rights and responsibilities. In the first two units, students will read informational texts that focus on the women’s suffrage movement and the leadership of New Yorker Susan B. Anthony. Specifically, they will read firsthand and secondhand accounts of her arrest and trial for voting in a time when women were outlawed from doing so. Students then read The Hope Chest by Karen Schwabach, a historical fiction novel set in the weeks leading up to the passage of the 19th Amendment. They will continue to examine the idea of leaders of change and explore the theme “making a difference” by collecting evidence on how selected characters make a difference for others. After completing the novel, students will analyze this theme in selected passages of the novel and write an essay using evidence from the text to support their analysis.

In the final unit, students will connect the ideas of “leaders of change” and “making a difference” to their own lives by reading about the importance of voting. They will prepare for their performance task, a Public Service Announcement about the importance of voting. To prepare, they will read various informational texts on contemporary voting to build background knowledge and collect evidence for their scripts. They will then write a draft of their script and practice speaking before recording and presenting their Public Service Announcement to peers, their parents, or local high school seniors. This performance task centers on ELA Standards RI.4.9, W.4.1, W.4.4, SL.4.3, SL.4.4, SL.4.5, SL.4.6, L.4.1c and f, and L.4.3.

Week-at-a-Glance

Each module is approximately 8 weeks of instruction broken into 3 units. The "week at a glance" chart in the curriculum map gives the big picture, breaking down the module into a detailed week-by-week view. It shows how the module unfolds, the focus of each week of instruction, and where the six assessments and the performance task occur.

Big Ideas & Guiding Questions

  • What makes someone a leader of change?
  • How do leaders impact others?
  • How can one person make a difference?
  • Leaders of change must sometimes break unfair rules. One person can take action to change things for the better.

Content Connections

This module is designed to address English Language Arts standards. However, the module intentionally incorporates Social Studies and science content that may align to additional teaching during other parts of the day. These intentional connections are described below.

NYS Social Studies Core Curriculum

  • 4.2.c Many people from the past and present of New York are famous for the many ways they have contributed to their state, nation, and the world in the areas of business, politics, arts, education, and science.
  • 4.9.b The United States and New York constitutions describe the basic rights of people and the essential function and structure of their respective governments.
  • 4.9.c The American constitutional government is based on principles of representative government, shared authority, fairness, and equality.
  • 4.9.e The people of New York are affected by both the United States and New York constitutions.
  • 4.11.a Major eras and events in United States history have impacted and been impacted by New York and its citizens.
  • 4.13.a The United States democratic system requires active participation from its citizens.

Texts

Texts to Buy

Texts that need to be procured. Please download the Trade Book List for procurement guidance.


Cover Text Quantity ISBNs
The Hope Chest
by Karen Schwabach
One per student
ISBN: 978- 0375840968, 0375840966

Texts included in the module

Texts that are included in the lesson materials.

Cover Text Quantity Publisher
Frederick Douglass: Freedom’s Champion
by Patrick S. Washburn
A Historic Inauguration Day
by Expeditionary Learning
A Firsthand Account of Inauguration Day
by Corey Scholes
“On Women’s Right to Suffrage
by Susan B. Anthony
I Can’t Wait to Vote!
by Expeditionary Learning for instructional purposes
2013
Youth Power
by Karen Fanning and Bryan Brown
2008
Miss Susan B. Anthony Fined $100 and Costs for Illegal Voting
by The New York Times
1873
Order in the Court
by Ira Peck and Kathy Wilmore
2008
The Vote
by Rebecca Hershey
2003

Outcomes

CCS Standards: Reading—LiteratureLong-Term Learning Targets
  • RL.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.4.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.
  • RL.4.3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
  • RL.4.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
  • RL.4.6. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.
  • RL.4.7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.
  • I can explain what a text says using specific details from the text.
  • I can make inferences using specific details from text.
  • I can determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem.
  • I can summarize a story, drama, or poem.
  • I can describe a story’s character, setting, or events using specific details from the text.
  • I can determine word meaning in a text.
  • I can compare and contrast different narrators’ points of view.
  • I can make connection between a text and the text’s visuals.
CCS Standards: Reading-Informational TextLong-Term Learning Targets
  • RI.4.2. Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.
  • RI.4.4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.
  • RI.4.5. Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.
  • RI.4.6. Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.
  • RI.4.8. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.
  • RI.4.9. Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.
  • I can determine the main idea using specific details from the text.
  • I can summarize informational or argumentative text.
  • I can determine the meaning of academic words or phrases in an informational text.
  • I can determine the meaning of content words or phrases in an informational text.
  • I can describe the organizational structure in informational or persuasive text (chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution).
  • I can compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic.
  • I can explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.
  • I can accurately synthesize information from two texts on the same topic.
CCS Standards: WritingLong-Term Learning Targets
  • W.4.1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

a.  Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

b.  Provide reasons (because) that are supported by facts and details (evidence or data).

c.  Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition).

d.  Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

  • W.4.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

a.  Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

b.  Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

c.  Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because).

d.  Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

e.  Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

  • W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

a.  Apply grade 4 reading standards to literature (e.g., “Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions].”).

b.  Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text”).

  • I can write an opinion piece that supports a point of view with reasons and information.

a.  I can introduce the topic of my opinion piece.

a.  I can create an organizational structure in which I group together related ideas.

b.  I can identify reasons that support my opinion.

c.  I can use linking words to connect my opinion and reasons.

d.  I can construct a concluding statement or section for my opinion piece.

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and information clearly.

a.  I can introduce a topic clearly.

a.  I can group supporting facts together about a topic in an informative/explanatory text

a.  I can use text, formatting, illustrations, and multi-media to support my topic.

b.  I can develop the topic with facts, definitions, details, and quotations.

c.  I can use linking words and phrases to connect ideas within categories of information. (e.g., another, for example, also, because)

d.  I can use precise, content-specific language/vocabulary to inform or explain about a topic.

e.  I can construct a concluding statement or section of an informative/explanatory text.

  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.

 a.  (e.g., “Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions].”).

b.  (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text”).

CCS Standards: Speaking and ListeningLong-Term Learning Targets
  • SL.4.3. Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.
  • SL.4.4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
  • SL.4.5. Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
  • SL.4.6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
  • I can identify the reason a speaker provides to support a particular point.
  • I can identify evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.
  • I can report on a topic or text using organized facts and details.
  • I can speak clearly and at an understandable pace.
  • I can add audio or visual support to a presentation in order to enhance main ideas or themes.
  • I use formal English when appropriate.
CCS Standards: LanguageLong-Term Learning Targets
  • L.4.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

a.  Use context (e.g., definitions, examples, or restatements in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

b.  Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., telegraph, photograph, autograph).

c.  Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.

  • L.4.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

a.  Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context.

b.  Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

c.  Demonstrate understanding of words by relating them to their opposites (antonyms) and to words with similar but not identical meanings (synonyms).

  • L.4.1c Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

c.  Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey

f.  Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.*

  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of words and phrases.

a.  I can use context to help me determine what a word or phrase means.

b.  I can use common affixes and roots as clues to help me determine what a word means. (e.g., telegraph, photograph, autograph)

c.  I can use resource materials (glossaries, dictionaries, thesauruses) to help me determine the pronunciation and meaning of key words and phrases.

  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and slight differences in word meanings.

a.  I can explain the meaning of simple similes in context.

a.  I can explain the meaning of simple metaphors in context.

b.  I can explain the meaning of common idioms.

b.  I can explain the meaning of common adages.

b.  I can explain the meaning of common proverbs.

c.  I can name synonyms and antonyms for vocabulary words.

  • I can use grammar conventions to send a clear message to a reader or listener.

c.  I can use ‘can’, ‘may’, and ‘must’ correctly.

f.  I can write complete sentences.

CCS Standards: LanguageLong-Term Learning Targets
  • L.4.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

a.  Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely.*

b.  Choose punctuation for effect.*

c.  Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion).

a.  I can express ideas using carefully chosen words.

b.  I can choose punctuation for effect in my writing.

c.  I use formal English when appropriate.

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