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ELA G4:M2A

Interdependent Roles in Colonial Times

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The Foundational Reading and Language Standards Resources Package for Grades 3–5

Use this guide to build additional literacy blocks alongside the module lessons.

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Students learn about what life was like in Colonial America. They go on to study the many roles people played in a colonial settlement and how necessary their interdependence was for survival. Students select one role to explore more deeply through various forms of nonfiction texts. With an emphasis on making inferences, summarizing informational text, basic research (note-taking and pulling together information from a variety of texts), this module will foster students’ abilities to synthesize information from multiple sources and integrate research into their writing. At the end of the module, students participate in several critique experiences during the revision process as they write a research-based narrative that vividly describes an event in a colonist’s life.

Week-at-a-Glance

Each module is approximately 8 weeks of instruction broken into 3 units. The "week at a glance" chart in the curriculum map gives the big picture, breaking down the module into a detailed week-by-week view. It shows how the module unfolds, the focus of each week of instruction, and where the six assessments and the performance task occur.

Big Ideas & Guiding Questions

  • Members of colonial communities were interdependent.
  • Experts use reading, viewing, and listening to gather and organize information from a variety of sources.
  • Synthesizing information from multiple sources helps me deepen my expertise on a topic.
  • In what ways was interdependence in Colonial America essential to survival?
  • How can a writer portray life during Colonial America using historical accuracy?
  • Why do researchers use multiple sources?

Content Connections

This module is designed to address English Language Arts standards. However, the module intentionally incorporates Social Studies content that may align to additional teaching during other parts of the day. These intentional connections are described below.

Big ideas and guiding questions are informed by the New York State Common Core K-8 Social Studies Framework:

Colonial America

  • Groups of people who migrated to our local region and into New York State
  • Ways that people depended on and modified their physical environments
  • Lifestyles in the colonies—comparisons during different time periods
  • Different types of daily activities, including social/cultural, political, economic, scientific/technological, or religious
  • Ways that colonists depended on and modified their physical environments

Texts

Texts to Buy

Texts that need to be procured. Please download the Trade Book List for procurement guidance.


Cover Text Quantity ISBNs
If You Lived in Colonial Times
by Ann McGovern
One per student
ISBN: 978-0-590-45160-4, 059045160X
The Scoop on Clothes, Homes, and Daily Life in Colonial America
by Elizabeth Raum
One per student
ISBN: 978-1429672139, 1429672137

Texts included in the module

Texts that are included in the lesson materials.

Cover Text Quantity Publisher
Inventory of John Allen (1659–1704)
by Hampshire Probate Records
Joshua’s Gold
by Mary Lois Sanders
Making Candles, Colonial Style
by Rebecca S. Fisher
Mystery of the Deep
by Allyson Gulliver
School of Freedom
by Beverly J. Letchworth
Colonial Trades
by Expeditionary Learning
Bringing Home the Gold
by Carrol J. Swanson
Colonial Trades: The Shoemaker
by Expeditionary Learning
Roles in a Colonial Village
by Expeditionary Learning
Colonial Trades: The Cooper
by Expeditionary Learning
Shipbuilders
by Expeditionary Learning
Colonial Trades: The Printer
by Expeditionary Learning
Religion in the Colonies
by Expeditionary Learning
Colonial Trades: The Silversmith
by Expeditionary Learning
Farming in Colonial America
by Expeditionary Learning
The Wheelwright’s Role in a Colonial Village
by Expeditionary Learning
The Importance of the Wheelwright
by Expeditionary Learning
Colonial Trades: The Wheelwright
by Expeditionary Learning
The Colonists and American Indians
by Expeditionary Learning
A New York Merchant: Adam Johnson
by Expeditionary Learning
Colonial Trades: The Carpenter
by Expeditionary Learning
Apprenticeships in Colonial America
by Expeditionary Learning
Colonial Trades: The Blacksmith
by Expeditionary Learning
Colonial America: The Craftspeople
by Expeditionary Learning

Outcomes

CCS Standards: Reading-LiteratureLong-Term Learning Targets
  • RL.4.3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
  • I can describe a story’s character, setting, or events using specific details from the text.
CCS Standards: Reading- Informational TextLong-Term Learning Targets

• RI.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

• I can explain what a text says using specific details from the text. • I can make inferences using specific details from the text.

• RI.4.2. Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

• I can determine the main idea using specific details from the text. • I can summarize informational or persuasive text.

• RI.4.3. Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

• I can explain the main points in a historical, scientific, or technical text, using specific details in the text.

• RI.4.4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.

• I can determine the meaning of academic words or phrases in an informational text. • I can determine the meaning of content words or phrases in an informational text.

• RI.4.7. Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

• I can interpret information presented through charts, graphs, timelines, or Web sites. • I can explain how visual or graphic information helps me understand the text around it.

• RI.4.10. By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

• I can read grade-level informational texts proficiently and independently. • I can read above-grade informational texts with scaffolding and support.

CCS Standards: WritingLong-Term Learning Targets

• W.4.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

• I can produce writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

• W.4.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

• I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and information clearly. b. I can develop the topic with facts, definitions, details, and quotations. d. I can use precise, content-specific language/vocabulary to inform or explain about a topic.

• W.4.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

• With support from peers and adults, I can use the writing process to produce clear and coherent writing.

• W.4.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

• I can write narrative text about real or imagined experiences or events. a. I can establish a situation. a. I can introduce the narrator and/or characters of my narrative. a. I can organize events in an order that makes sense in my narrative. b. I can use dialogue and descriptions to show the actions, thoughts and feelings of my characters. c. I can use transitional words and phrases to show the sequence of events in a narrative text. d. I can use sensory details to describe experiences and events precisely. e. I can write a conclusion to my narrative.

• W.4.6. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

• With support, I can use technology to publish a piece of writing. • I can use technology to collaborate with others to produce a piece of writing. • I can type at least one page of writing in a single setting.

• W.4.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

• I can conduct a research project to become knowledgeable about a topic.

• W.4.8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.

• I can recall information that is important to a topic. • I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. • I can sort my notes into categories. • I can provide a list of sources I used to gather information.

• W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. – a. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions].”). – b. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.”).

• I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. – a. I can describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). – b. I can explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.

• W.4.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

• I can write for a variety of reasons.

CCS Standards: Speaking and ListeningLong-Term Learning Targets

• SL.4.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. – a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. – b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. – c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others. – d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

• I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about 4th grade topics and texts. – a. I can prepare myself to participate in discussions. – a. I can draw on information to explore ideas in the discussion. – b. I can follow our class norms when I participate in a conversation. – c. I can ask questions that are on the topic being discussed. – c. I can answer questions about the topic being discussed. – c. I can connect my questions and responses to what others say. – d. After a discussion, I can explain what I understand about the topic being discussed.

• SL.4.2. Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

• I can paraphrase portions of a text that is read aloud to me. • I can paraphrase information that is presented in pictures and/or numbers.

CCS Standards: LanguageLong-Term Learning Targets

• L.4.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. – a. Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why). – b. Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses. – c. Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions. – d. Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag). – e. Form and use prepositional phrases. – f. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons. – g. Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to/too/two; there/their).

• I can use grammar conventions to send a clear message to a reader or listener. – a. I can use relative pronouns (e.g.; who, whose, whom, which, that). – a. I can use relative adverbs (e.g.; where, when, why). – b. I can use progressive verb tenses (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking). – c. I can use can, may, and must correctly. – d. I can use conventional patterns to order adjectives within sentences (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag). – e. I can use prepositional phrases. – f. I can write complete sentences. – f. I can recognize fragmented and run-on sentences. – g. I can correctly use homophones (e.g., to/too/two; there/their).

• L.4.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. – a. Use correct capitalization. – b. Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text. – c. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence. – d. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

• I can use conventions to send a clear message to my reader. – a. I can use correct capitalization in my writing. – b. I can use commas and quotation marks to identify speech and quotations from a text. – c. I can use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence. – d. I can spell grade-appropriate words correctly. – d. I can use resources to check and correct my spelling.

• L.4.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. – a. Use context (e.g., definitions, examples, or restatements in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. – b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., telegraph, photograph, autograph). – c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.

• I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of words and phrases. – a. I can use context to help me to determine what a word or phrase means. – b. I can use common affixes and roots as clues to help me determine what a word means (e.g., telegraph, photograph, autograph). – c. I can use resource materials (glossaries, dictionaries, thesauruses) to help me determine the pronunciation and meaning of key words and phrases.

• L.4.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being (e.g., quizzed, whined, stammered) and that are basic to a particular topic (e.g., wildlife, conservation, and endangered when discussing animal preservation).

• I can accurately use fourth-grade academic vocabulary to express my ideas.

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