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ELA G3:M2A

Adaptations and the Wide World of Frogs

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The Foundational Reading and Language Standards Resources Package for Grades 3–5

Use this guide to build additional literacy blocks alongside the module lessons.

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In this module, students will use literacy skills to become experts—people who use reading, writing, listening, and speaking to build and share deep knowledge about a topic. (This focus on research intentionally builds on Module 1, in which students explored the superpowers of reading.) The module will begin with a class study of the bullfrog, an example of a “true frog,” that exhibits quintessentially froggy characteristics.

In Unit 2, students will form research groups to become experts on various “freaky” frogs—frogs that push the boundaries of “frogginess” with unusual adaptations that help them to survive in extreme environments throughout the world. Students will build their reading, research, writing, and collaborative discussion skills through studying their expert frog. Throughout the module, students will consistently reflect on the role of literacy in building and sharing expertise. Students will demonstrate their expertise through a “freaky frog trading card”—a research-based narrative that highlights their research and educates others about the amazing diversity of frogs, with a focus on how their freaky frog survives. This task will center on ELA Standards W.3.2, W.3.3, W.3.4, W.3.5, and L.3.3.

Week-at-a-Glance

Each module is approximately 8 weeks of instruction broken into 3 units. The "week at a glance" chart in the curriculum map gives the big picture, breaking down the module into a detailed week-by-week view. It shows how the module unfolds, the focus of each week of instruction, and where the six assessments and the performance task occur.

Big Ideas & Guiding Questions

  • What do experts do?
  • How do I become an expert?
  • How do frogs survive?
  • Experts use reading, viewing, and listening to gather and organize info from a variety of sources.
  • Experts share information through writing and speaking.

Content: Animals have unique adaptations that help them to survive in various environments.

Content Connections

  • This module is designed to address English Language Arts standards and to be taught during the literacy block of the school day. Nevertheless, the module intentionally incorporates Science content that may align to additional teaching during other parts of the day. These intentional connections are described below.

Texts

Texts to Buy

Texts that need to be procured. Please download the Trade Book List for procurement guidance.


Cover Text Quantity ISBNs
Everything You Need To Know About Frogs And Other Slippery Creatures
by DK Publishing
One per student
ISBN: 978-0756682323, 0756682320
Poison Dart Frogs Up Close
by Carmen Bredeson
One per student
ISBN: 978-1598454208, 159845420X
Bullfrog At Magnolia Circle
by Deborah Dennard, Illustrations by Kristin Kest
One per student
ISBN: 978-1607270690, 1607270692
Deadly Poison Dart Frogs
by Lincoln James
One per student
ISBN: 978-1433957444, 1433957442
All The Small Poems And Fourteen More
by Valerie Worth, Illustrated by Natalie Babbitt
ISBN: 978-0374403454

Texts included in the module

Texts that are included in the lesson materials.

Cover Text Quantity Publisher
Spadefoot Toad
by Melanie Freeman
Staying Alive, Animal Adaptations
by Expeditionary Learning
The Poison Dart Frog
by Douglas Florian
The Red-Eyed Tree Frog
by Douglas Florian
The Glass Frog
by Douglas Florian

Outcomes

CCS Standards: Reading-LiteratureLong-Term Learning Targets
  • RL.3.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
  • I can determine the meaning of words using clues from the story.
  • I can identify literal and nonliteral language in a story.
CCS Standards: Reading- Informational TextLong-Term Learning Targets
  • RI.3.1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • RI.3.2. Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
  • RI.3.3. Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.
  • RI.3.4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.
  • RI.3.5. Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
  • RI.3.7. Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).
  • RI.3.9. Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.
  • I can ask questions to deepen my understanding of informational text.
  • I can answer questions using specific details from informational text.
  • I can determine the main idea of an informational text.
  • I can retell key ideas from an informational text.
  • I can describe how events, ideas, or concepts in an informational text are related.
  • I can describe steps in a procedure, in the order they should happen.
  • I can determine the meaning of unknown words in informational text.
  • I can use text features to locate information efficiently.
  • I can use information from illustrations (maps, photographs) to understand informational texts.
  • I can use information from the words to understand informational texts.
  • I can compare and contrast the main ideas and key details in two texts on the same topic.
CCS Standards: Reading-Foundational SkillsLong-Term Learning Targets
  • RF.3.4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

a. Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.

b. Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression.

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.

  • I can read third-grade-level texts accurately and fluently to make meaning.

         a. I can read third-grade-level texts with purpose.

         b. I can read third-grade-level texts with fluency.

         c. I can use clues in the text to check my accuracy.

         d. I can reread to make sure that what I’m reading makes sense.

CCS Standards: WritingLong-Term Learning Targets
  • W.3.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

a.      Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension.

b.     Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.

c.      Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information.

d.      Provide a concluding statement or section.

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and information clearly.

a.      I can write an informative/explanatory text that has a clear topic.

a.      I can group supporting facts together about a topic in an informative/explanatory text using both text and illustrations.

b.     I can develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.

c.      I can use linking words and phrases to connect ideas within categories of information. (e.g., also, another, and, more, but)

d.      I can construct a closure on the topic of an informative/explanatory text. 

CCS Standards: WritingLong-Term Learning Targets
  • W.3.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

a.      Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

b.     Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations.

c.      Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.

d.      Provide a sense of closure.

  • W.3.4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in Standards 1–3 above.)
  • W.3.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
  • W.3.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
  • W.3.8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
  • W.3.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  • I can craft narrative texts about real or imagined experiences or events.

a.      I can establish a situation.

a.      I can introduce the narrator and/or characters of my narrative.

a.      I can organize events in an order that makes sense in my narrative.

a.      I can use dialogue to show the actions, thoughts, and feelings of my characters.

b.     I can use descriptive words to show the actions, thoughts, and feelings of my characters.

b.     I can use transitional words and expressions to show passage of time in a narrative text.

c.      I can write a conclusion to my narrative.

  • With support from adults, I can produce writing that is appropriate to task and purpose.
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use the writing process to plan, revise, and edit my writing.
  • I can conduct a research project to become knowledgeable about a topic.
  • I can recall information from experiences.
  • I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes.
  • I can sort evidence into provided categories.
  • I can write for a variety of reasons.
CCS Standards: Speaking & ListeningLong-Term Learning Targets
  • SL.3.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a.    Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

b.   Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

c.    Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.

d.    Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

  • SL.3.2. Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • SL.3.6. Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification.
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about third grade topics and texts.

a.    I can prepare myself to participate in discussions.

a.    I can draw on information to explore the ideas in a discussion.

b.   I can follow our class norms when I participate in a conversation.

c.    I can ask questions so I’m clear about what is being discussed.

c.    I can ask questions that are on the topic being discussed.

c.    I can connect my questions to what others say.

d.    I can explain what I understand about the topic being discussed.

  • I can determine the main idea and supporting details in text that is read aloud to me.
  • I can determine the main idea and supporting details of information that is presented in pictures and/or numbers.
  • I can speak in complete sentences with appropriate detail.
CCS Standards: LanguageLong-Term Learning Targets
  • L.3.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

a.      Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.

b.     Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.

c.      Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).

d.      Form and use regular and irregular verbs.

e.      Form and use the simple (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk) verb tenses.

f.      Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.

g.      Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.

h.     Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.

i.      Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.

  • L.3.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a.      Capitalize appropriate words in titles.

b.     Use commas in addresses.

c.      Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.

d.      Form and use possessives.

e.      Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and for adding suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness).

f.      Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in writing words.

g.      Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

  • I can use grammar conventions to send a clear message to a reader or listener.

a.      I can explain the functions of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs.

b.     I can use regular and irregular plural nouns.

c.      I can use abstract nouns. (e.g., childhood)

d.      I can use regular and irregular verbs.

e.      I can use simple verb tenses (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk).

f.      I can make subjects and verbs agree in my writing.

f.      I can make pronouns and antecedents agree in my writing.

g.      I can use adjectives to describe nouns.

g.      I can use adverbs to describe actions.

h.     I can use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.

i.      I can write simple, complex and compound sentences.

  • I can use conventions to send a clear message to my reader.

a.      I can capitalize appropriate words in titles.

b.     I can use commas in addresses.

c.      I can use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.

d.      I can use possessives in my writing.

e.      I can spell words that have suffixes added to base words correctly.

f.      I can use spelling patterns to spell words correctly.

g.      I can use resources to check and correct my spelling.

CCS Standards: LanguageLong-Term Learning Targets
  • L.3.3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

a.      Choose words and phrases for effect.

b.     Recognize and observe differences between the conventions of spoken and written standard English.

  • L.3.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning word and phrases based on grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

a.      Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

b.     Determine the meaning of the new word formed when a known affix is added to a known word (e.g., agreeable/disagreeable, comfortable/uncomfortable, care/careless, heat/preheat).

c.      Use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with the same root (e.g., company, companion).

d.      Use glossaries or beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.

  • L.3.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner that night we went looking for them).
  • I can express ideas using carefully chosen words.
  • I can compare how people use language when they write versus when they talk.
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of words and phrases.

a.      I can use what the sentence says to help me to determine what a word or phrase means.

b.     I can use common prefixes to help me determine what a word means. (e.g., agreeable/disagreeable, comfortable/uncomfortable, care/careless, heat/preheat)

c.      I can use the meaning of root words to help me determine the meaning of new words with the same root (e.g., company, companion).

d.      I can use resource materials (glossaries and dictionaries) to help me determine the meaning of key words and phrases.

  • I can accurately use third-grade academic vocabulary to express my ideas.

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