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ELA G3:M1:U2:L6

Reading Proficiently and Independently: The Power of Setting Goals

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The Foundational Reading and Language Standards Resources Package for Grades 3–5

Use this guide to build additional literacy blocks alongside the module lessons.

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories. (W.3.8)

 

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can identify my reading strengths and challenges in order to set goals for becoming an independent and proficient reader.
  • I can sort information about my strengths and challenges as a reader into categories.
  • Information/Evidence recording form
  • Accordion graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader (5 minutes)

B.  Vocabulary Mini Lesson: The Language of Goal Setting (10 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Revisiting Reading Superpowers Anchor Charts (5 minutes)

B.  Collecting My Reading Information (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Debrief (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Tonight for homework, continue to read independently, practicing ways to build your reading power. Share an area of strength and an area of challenge from your Reading Stamina tracker with someone at home.

  • The paragraph writing in this lesson reflects and reinforces the process of identifying a main topic and supporting it with a series of relevant and explained details that was introduced in Unit 1. Students use the same Accordion graphic organizer introduced in Unit 1 in their planning for this piece of writing as well.  Echoing this structure throughout all three units builds effective and efficient paragraph writing skills.

Vocabulary

VocabularyMaterials

proficient/proficiently, independent/independently, record, reflect, identify, evidence, data, sort, strengths, challenges, goals

 

  • Thank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco (book; one per student; from Lessons 1 and 2)
  • Information/Evidence recording form (one per student)
  • Model of Fictional Student’s Information/Evidence recording form (for Teacher Reference)
  • Anchor charts of Reading Superpowers (from previous lessons)
  • Individual student information on reading (e.g., DRA data, Who I Am as a Reader, Reading Stamina trackers, etc.; see Teaching Notes above)
  • Accordion graphic organizer on My Reading Goals (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to briefly share their Reading Stamina tracker from last night’s homework with a partner. Invite them to select one area of success and one area of challenge.
  • Show students the book Thank You, Mr. Falker. Remind them that they read excerpts from this text during Lessons 1 and 2. Flip through the pages to remind them of the story. Invite the students to Think-Pair-Share to identify how Trisha became a better reader. Give students time to think; then have them share their ideas with a partner. Invite individuals to share with the whole group. Prompt students to give details from the text to support their responses.
  • Remind students of their yearlong target: “I can read grade-level texts proficiently and independently.” Explain that Trisha and her teachers did all of those things so that she could read proficiently and independently. Review the meaning of the words proficiently and independently. Remind students that everything they are working on in literacy is in service of this big goal.
  • Consider providing nonlinguistic symbols with learning targets to assist ELLs in making connections.
  • Providing a moment to think before sharing allows individuals to process independently.
  • Sharing with a partner helps students develop confidence before sharing with the whole class.
  • Prompting for details holds students accountable to the text.

B. Vocabulary Mini Lesson: The Language of Goal Setting (10 minutes)

  • Orient students to the learning target: “I can identify my reading strengths and challenges in order to set goals for becoming an independent and proficient reader.”
  • Circle the words strengths, challenges, and goals. Ask the students to think about something they do outside of school and apply these words to this context. For example: “I like to play baseball. One of my strengths is that I can throw the ball a really long way. One of my challenges is that I am not a very good batter. One of my goals is to practice batting every day so that I never strike out.”
  •  Tell students that today they will set their own goals to help them build their reading power: “Think about how Mr. Falker had to remind Trisha of her strengths.” Some examples students might provide include: “She really wanted to read and she was good at drawing,” or “She also had some challenges; letters got all mixed up, and it was hard to sound out words. Knowing these things helped him set goals to help her.”
  • Careful attention to vocabulary helps to make the target clear and supports student thinking. Provide a variety of ways for accessing/interacting with vocabulary to accommodate various learning profiles.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Revisiting Reading Superpowers Anchor Charts (5 minutes)

  • Explain to the students that after they identify their strengths and challenges and set goals about how they will become more proficient and independent readers, they will write a letter to an important person in their life that describes what their reading goals are.
  • Display the various anchor charts of Reading Superpowers. Tell students that all of these charts are designed to help them build their “reading superpowers.” Ask several students to share how something from the list might help them as readers. If students feel too shy to share their own strengths and challenges, they can discuss what Trisha was like early on as a reader and how something from that list might have been helpful to her.
  • Explain to the students that some, not all, of the ideas from the anchor charts might help them build their reading power based on what they know about themselves as readers.
  • Reviewing academic vocabulary assists all students developing academic language.
  • If needed, consider providing ELLs with a smaller chunk of information to decode.
  • Consider providing a list of strengths and challenges to assist students in understanding.

B. Collecting My Reading Information (20 minutes)

  • Remind the students that each reader is different and that our strengths and challenges will be different as well. Explain that in order to know themselves as readers they will need to look at information about themselves. Share the target: “I can sort information about my strengths and challenges as a reader into categories.”
  • Have students define “information.” Walk through the types of information that have been collected about the students as readers. This may include Who I Am as a Reader, Reading Stamina trackers, DRA (Developmental Reading Assessment) scores or summaries, fluency scores, etc.
  • Note: Limit the explanation and modeling to 10 minutes. Time will vary based on how familiar students are with looking at the shared data.
  • Explain that this is “evidence” of their strengths and challenges. Model how to read data and record evidence using the Model of Fictional Student’s Information/Evidence recording form. (For example, when looking at fluency data, you might say: “I think one strength I have is reading fast. Hmmm, is there any evidence of this? I can see here that the teacher wrote ____; that means I read ___ words/minute. The goal for third-graders is _____. I also notice lots of words marked on my page. When I count them up, there are _____ mistakes. I think one of my challenges is that sometimes I read too fast so I make mistakes.”)
  • Give students information collected about them as readers. Allow 10 minutes for each student to look through his or her own information, recording evidence on the Information/Evidence recording form.
  • Providing a clear model supports students in understanding the thinking and the work they are expected to do.

 

C. Planning My Paragraph: Using the Accordion Graphic Organizer (15 minutes)

  • Once the students have collected and sorted their reading information, they can begin to plan their letter paragraph. Display the Accordion graphic organizer on an interactive white board or document camera. Explain to the students that before they begin writing their letters they need to organize their information so that the person reading it understands what is being shared.
  • Model for students using the Fictional Student’s Information/Evidence recording form to complete an Accordion graphic organizer. Explain to the students that the main idea, or purpose, of their letter is written in the box at the top. Students might write something similar to: “I am writing to share with you how I plan to become a better reader.” Direct students to look at the three boxes in the middle of the organizer. Explain that in these boxes students will share a strength in the top box (Something I’m Doing Well) with evidence to support that information. Then they will share two challenges that they have as a reader in the middle and bottom boxes (What I Need to Work On) with evidence to support that information. Then, in the final box students will share ways they will build their reading power. Students should also use specific evidence about the characters of The Boy Who Loved Words, The Incredible Book-Eating Boy, and Thank You, Mr. Falker to support their reflection and goal setting.
  • Answer any clarifying questions the students may have before letting them begin their writing work. Let them know you will be supporting them throughout the work time as needed.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Debrief (5 minutes)

  • As a Think-Pair-Share, ask: “How can knowing your strengths and challenges help you become an independent and proficient reader?” and “How are your reading strengths/challenges similar to those of the characters in Thank You, Mr. Falker, The Boy Who Loved Words, and The Incredible Book-Eating Boy?” If individuals share, record a few of these ideas to remind the students about in the beginning of the next lesson. Or have small groups write their answer.

Explain that in tomorrow’s lesson, they will set goals for themselves as readers.

 

Note: Review students’ Information/Evidence recording form and Accordion graphic organizer to assess their progress toward the target and ensure they are prepared for tomorrow’s lesson.

  • ELL language acquisition is facilitated by interacting with native speakers of English who provide models of language.

 

Assessment

None

Homework

Homework
  • Tonight for homework, continue to read independently, practicing ways to build your reading power. Share an area of strength and an area of challenge from your Reading Stamina tracker with someone at home.

Supporting Materials

None

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