You are here

ELA G3:M1:U2:L5

Independent Reading: Building the Power of Stamina

You are here:

The Foundational Reading and Language Standards Resources Package for Grades 3–5

Use this guide to build additional literacy blocks alongside the module lessons.

Download

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can identify the main message or lesson of a story using key details from the text. (R.L.3.2)
  • I can make connections between texts and ideas to comprehend what I read. (R.L.3.11)
  • I can choose a text that interests me. (RL.3.11)

Supporting Targets

Learning TargetsOngoing Assessments
  • I can identify the main message of The Incredible Book-Eating Boy.
  • I can make connections between my life, other books, or ideas to help me understand The Incredible Book-Eating Boy.
  • I can demonstrate stamina as I read a book that interests me.
  • Teacher observation
  • Student notes
  • Reading Stamina tracker

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader (5 minutes)

B.  Read-aloud and Discussion: The Incredible Book-Eating Boy (15 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Reading Stamina: Fishbowl and Discussion (10 minutes)

B.  Student Practice: Building Reading Stamina and Completing the Stamina Tracker (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Debrief (5 minutes)

B.  Self-Assessment (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read independently at home tonight. Practice building your stamina as a reader. Set a goal for yourself of how many minutes you will try to read. Complete the Reading Stamina tracker to show your progress toward the target.

  • Note that unlike other books in this module, The Incredible Book-Eating Boy is used just as a read-aloud and as brief whole group discussion to get kids thinking about the idea of reading stamina. Students do not do a close reading of this text; instead, they spend time in class practicing reading stamina with their independent reading book.
  • This lesson reminds students of the importance of reading a high volume of books at their own reading level. This proves particularly helpful for building student reading fluency and the academic vocabulary that the CCLS demands. See the Unit 2 Recommended Texts lists for books at various Lexile ranges related to the topic of this unit.
  • Preread The Incredible Book-Eating Boy.
  • Prepare to model the behaviors of a proficient independent reader.
  • Be sure all students have a book to read on their own or provide time for students to select a book at their independent reading level.
  • Review Fishbowl protocol.
  • Adapt the model Reading Stamina tracker as necessary.
  • Some students may benefit from instruction or review of these terms: power, increase, fishbowl, whisper, spot, “stick with.”

Vocabulary

VocabularyMaterials

identify, predictions, connections, proficient, demonstrate, stamina, interests, share, self-assess, evaluate, atlas, fierce, fussy, digest, properly, accident

 

  • The Incredible Book-Eating Boy (book; one text for the teacher)
  • Reading Stamina tracker (one per student and one to display)
  • Chart paper
  • Note cards
  • Document camera (or interactive white board)
  • Index cards
  • Chart paper for new anchor chart: Building Reader Stamina
  • Timer

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader (5 minutes)

  • Begin by asking students to form groups of three or four. Invite each student to share out two or three of their favorite words they selected for homework and explain why they chose those words.
  • Remind the students of the story they read over the last two days, The Boy Who Loved Words. Ask the class: “What challenges did Selig face? How did Selig use words to help others? What superpowers did he develop as a reader?” Students should share that Selig felt lonely and overwhelmed by all the words he collected. He decided to spread his love of words with other people. Selig built his word power in this text.
  • Orient the students to today’s first target: “I can identify the main message of The Incredible Book-Eating Boy.”
  • Underline the words identify, the main message, and share: “We have done this many times this year. We did this with Thank You, Mr. Falker and The Boy Who Loved Words. The main message in Thank You, Mr. Falker is that Trisha had to work hard, practice, and build her own reading superpowers to become an independent reader.” Ask students to identify the main message of The Boy Who Loved Words. Give them a minute to Think-Pair-Share. Invite one or two students to share their ideas with the whole class.
  • Orient students to the second target and read it aloud: “I can make connections between my life, other books, or ideas to help me understand The Incredible Book-Eating Boy.” Ask: “How might making connections between our own lives, other books, or other ideas help us understand a new book?” Give students a moment to think about this, then ask them to share with someone nearby. Have a few students share their thoughts with the whole group. Clarify as needed, perhaps using a connection to Thank You, Mr. Falker as an example. This could sound like: “When I was reading Thank You, Mr. Falker, I thought about how hard it was for me to learn how to [insert example, here, such as dance]. I felt scared and embarrassed at first. I had to work really hard, practice a lot, and get some help from an expert. As I read what was happening to Trisha, I realized I knew what this was like and I could really ‘get’ what she was going through. This connection to my own life really helped me understand the book.” Model briefly as needed. When it is clear students understand the instructions, release them to independent work.
  • Clarifying vocabulary meets the needs of ELLs and other students developing academic language.

B. Read-aloud and Discussion: The Incredible Book-Eating Boy (15 minutes)

Note: Unlike the other read-alouds in this module, the Incredible Book-Eating Boy read-aloud is interactive. This is because students will not do a close read of this text. Therefore, students need time to think and talk during the read-aloud. Be sure that throughout, students get to do the thinking and talking: Ask a question, let them ponder, and then address any confusion or misconceptions.

  • Display The Incredible Book-Eating Boy on the interactive white board or document camera.
  • Invite the students to look at the illustrations as you flip through each page of the book. Have students Think-Pair-Share about what the message of the story might be. Ask a few students to share their predictions.
  • Begin to read the text aloud to the students. Stop several times to ask questions and discuss what is happening in the story:

*   Page 4: Point out the image of Henry eating books. Ask students: “What do you see?” Invite them to turn and talk. Then ask about connections they make between what Henry is doing and their own lives. Listen for comments about eating. Ask students: “Can eating a book really make you smarter?”

*   Page 5: Linger on the word fierce. Ask students to try to figure out this word in context. Invite them to Think-Pair- Share. Guide students to understand that in this context, fierce means “incredibly rapid.”

*   Page 7: Ask: “When I read that Henry’s belly gets full when he eats books, I make a connection to how eating food makes me full. What gets full when we read books?” Invite students to Think-Pair-Share. Students may need help understanding that Henry does not actually eat books; it is a metaphor for him being a voracious reader.

*   Continue reading aloud, stopping periodically to emphasize key academic vocabulary or key phrases that will help students understand the main message. Be sure that throughout, students get to do the thinking and talking. Ask a question, let them ponder, and then address any confusion or misconceptions.

*   Stop on page 10. Then discuss with the class: “How does Henry become a true reader?” Give students time to Think-Pair-Share. They should share that instead of eating the books, Henry reads the books and discovers he can still become the smartest person on earth.

  • Invite the students to discuss what they learned about being a reader from The Incredible Book-Eating Boy. Ask: “What reading superpower did Henry develop that you could use when you read?” Students should share that Henry learned reading a lot can make him smarter and that reading takes time.
  • Increase interactions with vocabulary in context. This increases the rate of vocabulary acquisition for ELLs and other students.

 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading Stamina: Fishbowl and Discussion (10 minutes)

  • Orient students to the final learning target: “I can demonstrate stamina as I read a book that interests me.” Invite the students to discuss what stamina is and how they demonstrate that as a reader.
  • Tell students they will observe the independent reading behaviors of a reader (or readers) inside the Fishbowl. The models may be adults, older students in the school, or students from the class who have practiced in preparation for the model.
  • Remind students that their job during a Fishbowl is to watch and listen closely. They will use a recording form to write down their observations. Ask: “What do you see these readers doing to build their stamina?”
  • After a few minutes, ask students to Pair-Share two things they saw these readers doing. Create an anchor chart of student ideas and add any additional ideas as necessary. This Building Reading Stamina anchor chart might contain ideas like:

*   How do we build our reading stamina?”

*   Stay in my reading spot

*   Read silently or in a whisper voice

*   Read the whole time

*   Stick with my book until I finish it

*   Use reading strategies to understand what I read

*   Read carefully, and don’t just eat books like Henry

  • Discuss these strategies so students understand them clearly. Add pictures to support comprehension.
  • Show students a Reading Stamina tracker. Tell them that they will self-assess, or evaluate, how they did building their stamina as readers.
  • Consider allowing students to draw their observations, ideas, or notes when appropriate. This allows ELLs to participate in a meaningful way.
  • Provide anchor charts for processes such as “How do we build our reading stamina?” This would include stamina words with nonlinguistic representations.

 

B. Student Practice: Building Reading Stamina and Completing the Stamina Tracker (20 minutes)

  • Be sure all students have a book to read. Tell them they will have 15 minutes for their first try at practicing stamina. The goal is to work up to at least 30 minutes of independent reading.
  • Set the timer; observe students as they read. Confer with readers as appropriate and give verbal time checks and praise to maintain engagement.
  • Providing text choice for students fosters engagement.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Debrief (5 minutes)

  • Place students in small groups of three or four. Ask them to go around their group, first sharing something that they did well to build their stamina using the frame from their tracker: “One thing I did to build my stamina was ___.” During the second group go-round, students share a next step using the frame: “Next time, I will work hard to ______.”
  • After students share their stamina self-assessment, invite them to discuss a final question within their small group: “How will building your stamina increase your reading power?”
  • Call on a few students to share their answers.
  • When ELLs are asked to produce language, consider providing a sentence frame or starter, or a cloze sentence to assist with language production and the structure required.

 

B. Self-Assessment: (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to complete their Reading Stamina tracker. Reinforce the idea of honest reflection and that it’s okay to only hit some of the stamina criteria on the first try.
  • Challenge students to continue to work on their stamina at home.
  • Collect students’ Reading Stamina trackers to help plan next steps: Which students need support with their reading stamina?

Assessment

None

Homework

Homework
  • Read independently at home tonight. Practice building your stamina as a reader. Set a goal for yourself of how many minutes you will try to read. Complete the Reading Stamina tracker to show your progress toward the target.

Supporting Materials

None

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up