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ELA G8:M2B:U1

Understanding Shakespeare and Launching A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Launching the Module: The Universal Appeal of Shakespeare, Part 1

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different media to present an idea. (RI.8.7)
  • I can describe information from images about the universal appeal of Shakespeare.
  • I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of gathering information from images.
  • Notice/Wonder note-catcher 
  • Gallery Walk

Lesson 2The Authorship of Shakespeare: “The Shakespeare Shakedown”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can cite the evidence that Simon Schama uses to support his claims in “The Shakespeare Shakedown.”
  • Advantages/Disadvantages T-Chart (from homework)
  • “The Shakespeare Shakedown”: Lesson 2 text-dependent questions 
  • None

Lesson 3Analyzing the Author’s Perspective: “The Shakespeare Shakedown”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine an author’s point of view or purpose in informational text. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze Simon Schama’s perspective in “The Shakespeare Shakedown.”
  • I can analyze how Simon Schama acknowledges and responds to conflicting viewpoints.
  • QuickWrite 1 (from homework)
  • Highlighting in student copies of “The Shakespeare Shakedown”
  • “The Shakespeare Shakedown”: Lesson 3 text-dependent questions
  • Discussion Appointment
  • Chalk Talk

Lesson 4Analyzing the Central Claim and Supporting Claims: “The Shakespeare Shakedown”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze the development of a central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)
  • I can objectively summarize informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.8.8)
  • I can evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text (assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims). (RI.8.8)
  • I can identify Simon Schama’s argument in “The Shakespeare Shakedown.”
  • I can identify specific supporting claims that Simon Schama makes in “The Shakespeare Shakedown.”
  • I can evaluate evidence that backs a supporting claim in “The Shakespeare Shakedown.”
  • I can objectively summarize “The Shakespeare Shakedown.”
  • Lesson 3 Homework: Vocabulary in “The Shakespeare Shakedown” (one per student)
  • Highlighting in student copies of “The Shakespeare Shakedown”
  • Evaluating Evidence note-catcher
  • Quiz-Quiz-Trade

Lesson 5Analyzing Text Structure: “The Shakespeare Shakedown”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.8.8)
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in “The Shakespeare Shakedown,” including the role of a particular sentence in developing a supporting claim.
  • I can analyze the development of the argument in “The Shakespeare Shakedown.”
  • I can identify specific supporting claims that Simon Schama makes in “The Shakespeare Shakedown.”
  • Summary Writing graphic organizer (from homework)
  • Students’ annotated copies of “The Shakespeare Shakedown”
  • Fist to Five
  • None

Lesson 6Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing an Author’s Argument and Text Structure

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can objectively summarize informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can determine the central ideas of an informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the development of a central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can determine an author’s point of view or purpose in informational text. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze the development of the argument in “Top Ten Reasons Shakespeare Did Not Write Shakespeare.”
  • I can analyze the structure of a paragraph in “Top Ten Reasons Shakespeare Did Not Write Shakespeare,” including the role of particular sentences in developing a supporting claim.
  • I can objectively summarize “Top Ten Reasons Shakespeare Did Not Write Shakespeare.”
  • I can analyze the author’s perspective in “Top Ten Reasons Shakespeare Did Not Write Shakespeare.”
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment 
  • None

Lesson 7Launching A Midsummer Night’s Dream: The Universal Appeal of Shakespeare, Part 2

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can determine the central ideas of an informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can determine the central idea of the article “Shakespeare’s Universal Appeal Examined.”
  • I can use evidence from the article to analyze the central idea of Shakespeare’s universal appeal.
  • QuickWrite 2 (from homework)
  • Chalkboard Splash
  • Frayer Model: Control
  • Chalkboard Splash
  • Gallery Walk

Lesson 8Launching A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Identifying the Characters, Settings, and Conflicts.

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can name the main characters, settings, and conflicts in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • I can get the gist of Shakespeare’s writing in a scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • I can cite evidence from A Midsummer Night’s Dream to support my ideas.
  • QuickWrite 3 (from homework)
  • Act 1, Scene 2 summary 
  • None

Lesson 9Reading Shakespeare: Understanding Shakespeare’s Language

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can determine the meaning of words and phrases in literary text (figurative, connotative, and technical meanings). (RL.8.4)
  • I can analyze how specific lines of dialogue in A Midsummer Night’s Dream help the play move forward.
  • I can analyze Shakespeare’s use of language in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • Act 1, Scene 1 Written Conversation note-catcher
  • Lesson 9 structured notes
  • Written Conversation

Lesson 10Reading Shakespeare: Analyzing a Theme of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of a literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can determine a theme of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • I can analyze how characters’ words and actions reveal aspects of their character.
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream structured notes, 1.1.21–129 (from homework)
  • None

Lesson 11Text to Film Comparison: Bottom the Fool

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production follows the text or script of the same literary text. (RL.8.7)
  • I can evaluate the choices made by the director or actors in presenting an interpretation of a script. (RL.8.7)
  • I can compare the similarities and differences between a key scene in the play and how that scene is portrayed in the film.
  • I can evaluate the choices the director or actors made in the film.
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream structured notes, 1.1.130–257 (from homework)
  • Text to Film Comparison note-catcher
  • None

Lesson 12Author’s Craft: The Poetry of the Play

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone (analogies or allusions). (RL.8.4)
  • I can analyze the theme of control in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • I can analyze the poetic language or verse in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream structured notes, 1.2.1–107 (from homework)
  • None

Lesson 13Analyzing Character and Theme: Tracking Control in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can analyze the themes of control in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • I can analyze the poetic language or verse in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • I can analyze how characters’ words and actions reveal aspects of their character.
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream structured notes, 2.1.33–60, 153–194 (from homework)
  • Three Threes in a Row note-catcher
  • Evidence of Control note-catcher
  • Three Three’s in a Row

Lesson 14Analyzing Language, Character, and Theme: World Café Discussion

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of a literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone (analogies or allusions). (RL.8.4)
  • I can analyze the poetic language or verse in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • I can analyze how characters’ words and actions reveal aspects of their character.
  • I can analyze the theme of control in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream structured notes, 2.1.195–276; 2.2.33–89 (from homework)
  • Midsummer Night’s Dream 2.2.90–163 note-catcher
  • Evidence of Control note-catcher
  • World Cafe

Lesson 15Author’s Craft: Poetry and Prose

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can objectively summarize literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone (analogies or allusions). (RL.8.4)
  • I can analyze the theme of control in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • I can analyze the poetry and the prose language in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and how each contributes to meaning and tone.
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream structured notes, 2.2.90–163 (from homework)
  • None

Lesson 16Text to Film Comparison: Bottom’s Transformation

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how differences in points of view between characters and audience create effects in writing. (RL.8.6)
  • I can analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production follows the text or script of the same literary text. (RL.8.7)
  • I can evaluate the choices made by the director or actors in presenting an interpretation of a script. (RL.8.7)
  • I can analyze how the reader’s perspective is different from Bottom’s in a key scene in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and how this affects the reader.
  • I can compare the similarities and differences between a key scene in the play and how that scene is portrayed in the film.
  • I can evaluate the choices the director or actors made in the film.
  • Text to Film Comparison note-catcher
  • None

Lesson 17Characters’ Decisions: The Flow of Consequences in Midsummer

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of a literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone (analogies or allusions). (RL.8.4)
  • I can analyze the themes of control in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • I can analyze the poetic language or verse in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • I can analyze how characters’ words and actions reveal aspects of their character.
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream structured notes, 3.1.76–208 (from homework)
  • Evidence of Control note-catcher
  • None

Lesson 18End of Unit Assessment: Text to Film Comparison

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how differences in points of view between characters and audience create effects in writing. (RL.8.6)
  • I can analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production follows the text or script of the same literary text. (RL.8.7)
  • I can evaluate the choices made by the director or actors in presenting an interpretation of a script. (RL.8.7)
  • I can analyze how the reader’s perspective is different from Titania’s in a key scene of A Midsummer Night’s Dream and how this affects the reader.
  • I can compare the similarities and differences between a key scene in the play and how that scene is portrayed in the film.
  • I can evaluate the choices the director or actors made in the film.
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Text to Film Comparison
  • None

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