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ELA G8:M2A:U2

Case Study: Atticus

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Making Inferences: Analyzing How Words and Actions Reveal Character in To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapters 11–13)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can support my inferences about Chapters 11 through 13 of To Kill a Mockingbird with the strongest evidence from the text.
  • I can analyze what other characters’ dialogue about Atticus reveals about his character.
  • I can analyze how Atticus’s words and actions reveal his character.
  • Structured notes from Chapters 11–13 (from previous two lessons’ homework)
  • Three Threes in a Row Note-catcher
  • Atticus Note-catcher
  • Discussion Appointment

Lesson 2Text to Film Comparison: Taking a Stand at the Jailhouse (Chapters 14–15)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how difference in points of view between characters and audience create effects in writing. (RL.8.6)
  • I can analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production follows the text or script of the same literary text. (RL.8.7)
  • I can evaluate the choices made by the director or actors in presenting an interpretation of a script. (RL.8.7)
  • I can analyze how the reader’s perspective is different from Scout’s in Chapter 15 and creates an effect for the reader.
  • I can evaluate the similarities and differences between the novel and the film version of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Structured notes for Chapters 14 and 15 (from homework)
  • Analyzing Scout’s and the Reader’s Perspective Note-catcher
  • Text to Film Comparison Note-catcher
  • None

Lesson 3Analyzing Themes: The Golden Rule and Taking a Stand (Chapters 16-17)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze how the themes of the Golden Rule and taking a stand are developed in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Structured notes for Chapters 16 and 17 (from homework)
  • Analyzing Themes Note-catcher
  • Exit ticket
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Discussion Appointment

Lesson 4Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Text to Film and Perspective Comparison of To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapters 18 and one scene from Chapter 19)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can objectively summarize literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze how difference in points of view between characters and audience create effects in writing. (RL.8.6)
  • I can analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production follows the text or script of the same literary text. (RL.8.7)
  • I can evaluate the choices made by the director or actors in presenting an interpretation of a script. (RL.8.7)
  • I can objectively summarize Chapter 18 in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • I can analyze how the reader’s perspective is different from Scout’s in a key scene in Chapter 19 and how this affects the reader.
  • I can compare the similarities and differences between a key scene in the novel and how that scene is portrayed in the film.
  • I can evaluate the choices the director or actors made in the film.
  • Structured notes for Chapter 18 (from homework)
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment
  • None

Lesson 5Close Reading: Fishbowl Comparing Atticus and Mr. Gilmer (Chapters 17–19)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone (analogies or allusions). (RL.8.4)
  • I can express my own ideas clearly during discussions. (SL.8.1)
  • I can build on other’s ideas during discussions. (SL.8.1)
  • I can use the strongest evidence from the text in my close reading of a scene in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • I can analyze how Atticus’s questions reveal aspects of his character.
  • I can analyze the impact word choice has on meaning and tone as Atticus and Mr. Gilmer cross-examine witnesses.
  • I can share my ideas and build on other’s ideas during Fishbowl.
  • Structured notes for Chapter 19 (from homework)
  • Vocabulary Squares
  • Atticus Cross- Examination Note-catcher
  • Mr. Gilmer Cross- Examination Note-catcher`
  • Discussion Appointment
  • Fishbowl

Lesson 6Analyzing Word Choice: Atticus’s Closing Speech (Chapters 20-21)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the meaning of words and phrases in literary text (figurative, connotative, and technical meanings). (RL.8.4)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can understand the literal and figurative meaning of Atticus’s language in his closing speech.
  • I can understand the irony in Atticus’s word choice in his closing speech.
  • I can analyze how Atticus’s closing speech relates to the themes of taking a stand and the Golden Rule.
  • Structured notes for Chapters 20 and 21 (from homework)
  • Atticus’s Closing Speech Note-catcher
  • Discussion Appointment

Lesson 7Making Inferences: Analyzing Atticus (Chapters 22-23)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can support my inferences about Chapters 22 and 23 of To Kill a Mockingbird with the strongest evidence from the text.
  • I can analyze what other characters’ dialogue about Atticus reveals about his character.
  • I can analyze how Atticus’s words and actions reveal his character.
  • Structured notes for Chapters 22 and 23 (from homework)
  • Vocabulary Squares
  • Written Conversation Note-catcher
  • Chapter 23 Text-Dependent Questions Note-catcher
  • Discussion Appointment
  • Written Conversation

Lesson 8Four Corners: Taking a Stand in To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapters 24-26, plus synthesis of scenes in previous chapters)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can analyze how taking a stand is developed in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Structured notes for Chapters 24-26 (from homework)
  • Four Corners
  • Exit ticket
  • None

Lesson 9Analyzing the Model Essay: Studying Argument (Chapter 27, plus synthesis of scenes in previous chapters)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.7.1)
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.8.8)
  • I can analyze how an author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.7.1)
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.8.8)
  • I can analyze how an author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)
  • Chapter 27 structured notes (from homework)
  • Supporting Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer
  • Exit ticket
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Discussion Appointment

Lesson 10Writing an Argument Essay: Evaluating the Model and Crafting a Claim (Chapter 28, including synthesis of scenes in previous chapters)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.8.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.8.4)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1) 
  • I can craft the claim of my argument essay based on the strongest evidence.
  • I can choose relevant and compelling reasons to support the claim I am making in my argument essay.
  • Structured notes for Chapter 28 (from homework)
  • Exit ticket
  • Discussion Appointment
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 11Writing and Argument Essay: Peer Critique with Rubric (Chapters 29-31, including synthesis of scenes in previous chapters)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.8.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.8.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to ensure that purpose and audience have been addressed. (W.8.5)
  • I can select evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.8.9)
  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to send a clear message to my reader. (L.8.2)
  • I can critique my partner’s use of evidence using criteria from the To Kill a Mockingbird argument rubric.
  • I can revise my work by incorporating helpful feedback from my partner.
  • I can write an organized argument essay about To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Add bullet: I can use correct punctuation in my Quote Sandwich.
  • Structured notes for Chapters 29, 30, and 31 (from homework)
  • Quote Sandwich for Peer Critique
  • Exit ticket
  • Praise-Question-Suggest

Lesson 12Writing an Argument Essay: Planning the Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.8.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.8.4)
  • I can select reasons and support them with evidence to support my claim about To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • I can explain how the details develop the reasons that support my claim.
  • I can acknowledge and respond to a counterclaim.
  • Exit ticket
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Discussion Appointment

Lesson 13End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1: Drafting the Argument Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.8.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.8.4)
  • I can select evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.8.9)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot).(RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can write an organized argument essay about To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • In my essay, I can support my claim with reasons, details, and quotes from the novel.
  • In my essay, I can explain how the details develop the reasons that support my claim.
  • In my essay, I can acknowledge and respond to a counterclaim.
  • Essay draft
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 14Launching the Reader’s Theater Groups and Allocating Key Quotes and Scenes

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.8.1)
  • I can describe what Readers Theater is and list criteria of Readers Theater.
  • I can work effectively with a group to create group norms to make group discussion and collaborative work productive and enjoyable.
  • I can work effectively with a group to allocate a scene to each person in the group.
  • Exit ticket: My Key Quote and Scene
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 15Writing the First Draft of the Readers Theater Script

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.8.3)
  • I can create poetry, stories, and other literary forms. (W.8.11b)
  • I can analyze a model Readers Theater script to generate criteria of an effective Readers Theater script.
  • I can write a first draft of my Readers Theater script.
  • Draft Readers Theater script
  • None

Lesson 16End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Revise Essay Drafts

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to ensure that purpose and audience have been addressed. (W.8.5)
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.8.1)
  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to send a clear message to my reader. (L.8.2)
  • I can use feedback from others to revise and improve my essay.
  • I can use correct grammar and punctuation in my essay.
  • Revised Essay
  • None

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