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ELA G8:M2A:U1

Building Background Knowledge: Taking a Stand

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Launching The Module: Taking A Stand

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different media to present an idea. (RI.8.7)
  • I can get information from photographs about people who are taking a stand about something.
  • I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of gathering information from photographs.
  • Taking a Stand: Frayer Model
  • Building Background Knowledge
  • Gallery Walk

Lesson 2Taking a Stand: “Equal Rights for Women”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can cite the evidence that Shirley Chisholm uses to support her claims in “Equal Rights for Women.”
  • Student Note-catcher with text-dependent questions
  • None

Lesson 3Analyzing Text Structure and Summarizing Text: “Equal Rights for Women” by Shirley Chisholm

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.8.8)
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in “Equal Rights for Women,” including the role of a particular sentence in developing a key concept.
  • I can analyze the development of a central idea in “Equal Rights for Women.”
  • I can identify specific claims that Shirley Chisholm makes in “Equal Rights for Women.”
  • Annotated text “Equal Rights for Women”
  • Discussion Appointment

Lesson 4Central Idea and Supporting Details: “Equal Rights for Women”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)
  • I can objectively summarize informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.8.8)
  • I can evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text
  • (assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims). (RI.8.8) 
  • I can identify specific claims that Shirley Chisholm makes in “Equal Rights for Women.”
  • I can evaluate evidence that supports a claim in “Equal Rights for Women.”
  • I can objectively summarize “Equal Rights for Women.”`
  • Highlighting in student copies of “Equal Rights for Women”`
  • Jigsaw
  • Quiz-Quiz-Trade

Lesson 5Analyzing the Author’s Perspective: “Equal Rights for Women” by Shirley Chisholm

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine an author’s point of view or purpose in informational text. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze Shirley Chisholm’s perspective in “Equal Rights for Women.”
  • I can analyze how Shirley Chisholm acknowledges and responds to conflicting viewpoints. 
  • “Equal Rights for Women”: Lesson 5 Close Reading
  • Chalk Talk
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 6World Cafe: Analyzing Sojourner Truth "Ain't I a Woman?"

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)
  • I can objectively summarize an informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can determine an author’s point of view or purpose in informational text. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze the development of a central idea in “Ain’t I a Woman?”
  • I can analyze the structure of a paragraph, including the role of particular sentences, in “Ain’t I a Woman?”
  • I can analyze Sojourner Truth’s perspective in “Ain’t I a Woman?” 
  • Summary Writing graphic organizer
  • World Cafe

Lesson 7Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing Excerpts of Lyndon Johnson’s Speech “The Great Society”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)
  • I can objectively summarize an informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can determine an author’s point of view or purpose in informational text. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze the development of a central idea in “The Great Society.”
  • I can analyze the structure of a paragraph in “The Great Society,” including the role of particular sentences in developing a key concept.
  • I can objectively summarize “The Great Society.”
  • I can analyze Lyndon Johnson’s perspective in “The Great Society.”
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment
  • None

Lesson 8Launching To Kill a Mockingbird: Establishing Reading Routines (Chapter 1)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.8.1)
  • I can analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone (analogies or allusions). (RL.8.4)
  • I can use the strongest evidence from To Kill a Mockingbird in my understanding of the first part of Chapter 1.
  • I can participate in discussions about the text with a partner, small group, and the whole class.
  • I can analyze the impact of allusions to world events in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Structured Notes graphic organizer
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 9Analyzing Character: Understanding Atticus (Chapter 1, cont.)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.8.1)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can support my inferences about Chapter 1 of To Kill a Mockingbird with the strongest evidence from the text.
  • I can participate in discussions about the text with a partner, small group, and the whole class.
  • I can analyze how what other characters say about Atticus reveals his character.
  • I can analyze how Atticus’ words and actions reveal his character.
  • Structured notes for Chapter 1 (from homework)
  • None

Lesson 10Analyzing Text Structure: To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapter 2)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how different structures affect meaning and style (RL.8.5)
  • I can objectively summarize literary text (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze the narrative structure of Chapter 2 of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • I can objectively summarize Chapter 2 of To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Narrative structure
  • Revised Summary Writing handout
  • None

Lesson 11Close Reading: Focusing on Taking a Stand (Chapter 2, cont.)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.8.4)
  • I can deepen my understanding of key words in To Kill a Mockingbird by using a vocabulary square.
  • I can identify the strongest evidence in Chapter 2 that shows why characters take a stand.
  • Structured notes for Chapter 2 (from Lesson 9 homework)
  • Summary Writing handout (from Lesson 10 homework)
  • Vocabulary square
  • Answers to text-dependent questions
  • Exit ticket
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Discussion Appointment

Lesson 12Analyzing How Literature Draws on Themes from the Bible and World Religions: The Golden Rule (Chapter 3)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze the extent to which a filmed version of a story stays faithful to or departs from the text, evaluating the choices made by actors or directors. (RL.8.7).
  • I can analyze the connections between modern fiction and myths, traditional stories, or religious works (themes, patterns of events, character types). (RL.8.9)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.8.4)
  • I can deepen my understanding of key words in To Kill a Mockingbird by using a vocabulary square.
  • I can support my inferences about Chapter 3 of To Kill a Mockingbird with the strongest evidence from the text.
  • I can evaluate the similarities and differences between the novel and the film version of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • I can analyze how the author draws on the theme of the Golden Rule in Chapter 3.
  • Structured notes, Chapter 3 (from homework)
  • Vocabulary square
  • Golden Rule Note-catcher
  • Text to Film Comparison Note-catcher
  • Discussion Appointment
  • Gallery Walk

Lesson 13Making Inferences: The Golden Rule and the Radleys’ Melancholy Little Drama (Chapter 4)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can objectively summarize literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze the connections between modern fiction and myths, traditional stories, or religious works (themes, patterns of events, character types). (RL.8.9)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.8.3)
  • I can support my inferences about Chapter 4 of To Kill a Mockingbird with the strongest evidence from the text.
  • I can summarize Chapter 4 of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • I can analyze how the author draws on the theme of the Golden Rule in Chapter 4.
  • I can use context clues to determine the meaning of phrases in Chapter 4 of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Structured notes, Chapter 4 (from homework)
  • Chapter 4 summary
  • Golden Rule Note-catcher
  • Networking Sessions Note-catcher
  • Discussion Appointment
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 14Inferring about Character: Atticus (Chapter 5)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can determine figurative and connotative meanings of words and phrases as they are used in a text including analogies or allusions to other texts. (RL.8.4).
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.8.4)
  • I can deepen my understanding of key words in To Kill a Mockingbird by engaging in Quiz-Quiz-Trade.
  • I can support my inferences about Chapter 5 of To Kill a Mockingbird with the strongest evidence from the text.
  • I can determine the figurative meanings of words and phrases as they are used in Chapter 5 of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • QuickWrite
  • Discussion Appointment
  • Quiz-Quiz-Trade
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Chalk Talk

Lesson 15Comparing Text Structures: To Kill a Mockingbird and “Those Winter Sundays” (Chapters 6 and 7)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can objectively summarize literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can compare and contrast the structure of multiple texts. (RL.8.5)
  • I can analyze how different structures impact meaning and style of a text. (RL.8.5)
  • I can compare and contrast the structure of Chapter 6 of To Kill a Mockingbird and “Those Winter Sundays.”
  • I can analyze how the structures of Chapter 6 of To Kill a Mockingbird and “Those Winter Sundays” affect meaning. 
  • Close Reading “Those Winter Sundays” Note-catcher
  • Comparing and Contrasting Text Structures Note-catcher
  • Discussion Appointment

Lesson 16Jigsaw to Analyze Mood and Tone in To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapter 8)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze the connections between modern fiction and myths, traditional stories, or religious works (themes, patterns of events, character types). (RL.8.9)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can analyze how the structure of “Incident” helps create meaning.
  • I can infer how Scout’s perspective about Boo Radley changes from Chapter 1 to Chapter 8 based on events in these chapters.
  • Analyzing Scout’s Perspective about Boo Radley Note-catcher
  • Jigsaw
  • Discussion Appointment

Lesson 17Text Comparisons: Comparing Text Structures and Text Types (Chapter 9)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can compare and contrast the structure of multiple texts. (RL.8.5)
  • I can analyze how different structures impact meaning and style of a text. (RL.8.5)
  • I can analyze the extent to which a filmed version of a story stays faithful to or departs from the text, evaluating the choices made by actors or directors. (RL.8.7)
  • I can compare and contrast the structure of Chapter 8 of To Kill a Mockingbird and “Incident.”
  • I can analyze how the structures of Chapter 8 of To Kill a Mockingbird and “Incident” affect meaning.
  • I can evaluate the similarities and differences between the novel and the film version of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Comparing and Contrasting Text Structures Note-catcher
  • Text to Film Comparison Note-catcher
  • Written Conversation Note-catcher
  • Discussion Appointment
  • Written Conversation

Lesson 18World Café to Analyze Themes in To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapter 10)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze the connections between modern fiction and myths, traditional stories or religious works (themes, patterns of events, character types). (RL.8.9)
  • I can support my inferences about Chapter 10 of To Kill a Mockingbird with the strongest evidence from the text.
  • I can analyze how the author draws on the theme of the Golden Rule in Chapter 10.
  • Exit ticket
  • World Cafe
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Discussion Appointment

Lesson 19End of Unit Assessment: Analyzing Author’s Craft in To Kill a Mockingbird: Allusions, Text Structure, Connections to Traditional Themes, and Figurative Language

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone (analogies or allusions). (RL.8.4)
  • I can compare and contrast the structure of multiple texts. (RL.8.5)
  • I can analyze how different structures impact meaning and style of a text. (RL.8.5)
  • I can analyze the connections between modern fiction and myths, traditional stories, or religious works (themes, patterns of events, character types). (RL.8.9)
  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships and nuances in word meanings. (L.8.5)
  • I can analyze how the author uses the allusion to the Golden Rule in a new way.
  • I can compare and contrast how two texts, a poem, and a scene from the novel have different structures, which contribute to meaning and style.
  • I can analyze how the author draws on the theme of the Golden Rule in the novel.
  • I can analyze the figurative language in an excerpt from Chapter 18.
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment
  • None

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