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ELA G8:M1:U2

Case Study: Why do people flee home?

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Collecting Details: The Challenges Ha Faces and Ha as a Dynamic Character

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can review and add to my strategies of things close readers do.
  • I can identify key details that help me understand Ha.
  • I can explain how key details in the novel reveal the challenges Ha faces and her dynamic character.
  • Structured Notes (classwork)
  • Think-Write-Pair-Share
  • Give One-Get One-Move On

Lesson 2Rereading and Close Reading: Communism, “The Vietnam Wars,” and “Last Respects” (Pages 85 and 86)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (L.8.5)
  • I can explain how key details in the novel reveal the challenges Ha faces and her dynamic character.
  • I can infer the symbolism in the poem “Last Respects.”
  • Structured notes for pages 83–90 (from homework)
  • Who Is Ha? small group anchor chart
  • Last Respects note-catcher
  • Chalk Talk
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 3Building Background Knowledge: Fleeing Saigon as “Panic Rises”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of an informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the connections and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events in a text. (RI.8.3)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.8.4)
  • I can identify the strongest evidence in the text “Panic Rises in Saigon, but the Exits Are Few” that helps me explain what challenges refugees from South Vietnam faced.
  • I can use common Greek and Latin affixes (prefixes) and roots as clues to help me know what a word means.
  • I can identify common themes that connect the universal refugee experience.
  • Structured notes (for pages 91–111, from homework)
  • Fleeing Home: What Challenges Did Ha’s Family Face? graphic organizer
  • Answers to text-dependent questions
  • Prefixes note-catcher
  • None

Lesson 4Building Background Knowledge, Predicting, and Focusing on Key Vocabulary: “Refugees: Who, Where, Why”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can analyze the connections and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events in a text. (RI.8.3)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.8.4)
  • I can identify the strongest evidence in the text “Refugees: Who, Where, Why” that helps me explain challenges refugees face when fleeing home.
  • I can identify the strongest evidence in the text “Refugees: Who, Where, Why” that helps me explain challenges refugees face finding home.
  • I can use common Greek and Latin affixes (prefixes) and roots as clues to help me know what a word means.
  • Structured notes (pages 135–157 from homework)
  • Prefixes note-catcher
  • Annotated article “Refugees: Who, Where, Why”
  • Carousel Brainstorm

Lesson 5Building Background Knowledge and Summarizing: “Refugees: Who, Where, Why” Part 2

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can objectively summarize informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the connections and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events in a text. (RI.8.3)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.8.2)
  • I can identify the strongest evidence in the article “Refugees: Who, Where, Why” and the novel that help me explain challenges refugees face when fleeing home.
  • I can identify the strongest evidence in the article “Refugees: Who, Where, Why” and the novel that help me explain challenges refugees face finding home.
  • I can write a paragraph that provides an objective summary of “Refugees: Who, Where, Why.”
  • I can identify universal themes that connect refugee experiences.
  • Structured notes (for pages 135–157, from homework)
  • Annotated article “Refugees: Who, Where, Why” (from homework)
  • Summary Writing graphic organizer
  • Fleeing Home and Finding Home anchor charts
  • Chalkboard Splash

Lesson 6Building Background Knowledge: Challenges Bosnian Refugees Faced Fleeing and Finding Home

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can determine a theme or the central idea of an informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the connections and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events in a text. (RI.8.3)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.8.4)
  • I can identify the strongest evidence in the text “Children of War” that helps me explain what challenges refugees face when fleeing home.
  • I can identify the strongest evidence in the text “Children of War” that helps me explain challenges refugees face finding home.
  • I can identify common themes that connect the universal refugee experience.
  • Structured notes (pages 180–195 from homework)
  • Written summary of “Refugees: Who, What, Where” (from homework)
  • Summary Writing graphic organizer: “Children of War”
  • Evidence Sort
  • None

Lesson 7Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyze an Informational Text about a Refugee Experience

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can objectively summarize informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the connections and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events in a text. (RI.8.3)
  • I can determine the meaning of words and phrases in text (figurative, connotative, and technical meanings). (RI.8.4)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.8.4)
  • I can use evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.8.9)
  • I can identify the strongest evidence in the speech by Til Gurung that helps me explain why refugees leave their home.
  • I can identify the strongest evidence in the speech by Til Gurung that helps me explain challenges refugees face in their new country.
  • I can determine the meaning of unfamiliar words based on context clues.
  • I can cite evidence from the text to support analysis of an informational text.
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing an Informational Text about a Refugee Experience (RI.8.1, RI.8.2, RI.8.3, RI.8.4a, L.8.4, and W.8.9)
  • None

Lesson 8Analyzing the Content of a Model Essay: “How Ha’s Mother Is Turned ‘Inside Out’”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text (assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims). (RI.8.8)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.8.1)
  • I can make connections between the universal refugee experiences of fleeing/finding home and the title of the novel Inside Out & Back Again.
  • I can find the gist of a model essay.
  • I can choose the strongest evidence to support my answers to questions about a model essay.
  • I can evaluate the quality of evidence used to support the claims made in the model essay “How Ha’s Mother Is Turned ‘Inside Out’”
  • Structured notes (pages 196–212 from homework)
  • Answers to questions about model essay
  • None

Lesson 9Close Reading: Paragraph 1 of “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison” (from “Refugee Children in Canada: Searching for Identity”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of an informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can read above-grade informational texts with scaffolding and support. (RI.8.10)
  • I can find the gist of the first paragraph of “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison.”
  • I can analyze how specific words, phrases, and sentences help me understand how refugee and immigrant children are similar.
  • I can cite evidence to explain the similarities and differences between refugee children and immigrant children.
  • Answers to text-dependent questions, Part A
  • Give One-Get One-Move On

Lesson 10Analyzing the Significance of the Novel’s Title: Connecting the Universal Refugee Experience to Inside Out & Back Again

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can read above-grade informational texts with scaffolding and support. (RI.8.10)
  • I can use the strongest evidence from the novel and from the informational text to support my answers to questions.
  • I can make connections between evidence of the universal refugee experience and the title of the novel Inside Out & Back Again.
  • “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison”: Paragraph 1 Text-Dependent Questions, Part B
  • Jigsaw

Lesson 11Close Reading: Paragraphs 2 and 3 of “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison” and Introducing the NYS Expository Writing Rubric

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of an informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can read above-grade informational texts with scaffolding and support. (RI.8.10)
  • I can find the gist of Paragraphs 2 and 3 of “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison.”
  • I can analyze how specific words, phrases, and sentences help me understand what refugee and immigrant children need for successful adaptation.
  • I can read a text closely in order to answer text-dependent questions.
  • “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison”: Paragraphs 2 and 3 Text-Dependent Questions, Part A
  • None

Lesson 12Analyzing the Significance of the Novel’s Title: Connecting the Universal Refugee Experience to Inside Out & Back Again, Part 2

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can read above-grade informational texts with scaffolding and support. (RI.8.10)
  • I can use the strongest evidence from the novel and from the informational text to support my answers to questions.
  • I can make connections between evidence of the universal refugee experience and the title of the novel Inside Out & Back Again.
  • “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison”: Paragraphs 2 and 3 Text-Dependent Questions, Part B
  • Jigsaw

Lesson 13Close Reading: Paragraph 4 of “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of an informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can read above-grade informational texts with scaffolding and support. (RI.8.10)
  • I can find the gist of Paragraph 4 of “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison.”
  • I can analyze how specific words, phrases, and sentences help me understand what refugee and immigrant children need for successful adaptation.
  • I can read a text closely in order to answer text-dependent questions.
  • “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison”: Paragraph 4 Text-Dependent Questions, Part A
  • None

Lesson 14Analyzing the Significance of the Novel’s Title: Connecting the Universal Refugee Experience to Inside Out & Back Again, Part 3

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can read above-grade informational texts with scaffolding and support. (RI.8.10)
  • I can use the strongest evidence from the novel and from the informational text to support my answers to questions.
  • I can make connections between evidence of the universal refugee experience and the title of the novel Inside Out & Back Again.
  • “Refugee and Immigrant Children: A Comparison”: Paragraph 4 Text-Dependent Questions, Part B
  • Jigsaw

Lesson 15Connecting the Universal Refugee Experience of Fleeing and Finding Home to the Title of the Novel Inside Out & Back Again

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can make a claim about how the lives of refugees turn “inside out” when they flee home, using the strongest evidence I have collected from both the novel and informational text.
  • I can make a claim about how the lives of refugees turn “back again” as they find a new home, using the strongest evidence I have collected from both the novel and informational text.
  • I can cite where I found my evidence.
  • Two Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizers (one for Body Paragraph 1, “Inside Out,” and one for Body Paragraph 2, “Back Again”)
  • None

Lesson 16Planning the Introductory and Concluding Paragraphs of the End of Unit Assessment Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.8.2)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.8.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use the writing process to ensure that purpose and audience have been addressed. (W.8.5)
  • I can plan effective introductory and concluding paragraphs for my analytical essay.
  • I can cite where I found my evidence.
  • Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (with a claim to answer the question: “Who is Ha before she flees home?”)
  • Planning Your Essay graphic organizer (homework for Lessons 15 and 16)
  • Peer Critique

Lesson 17End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part One: First Draft of Analysis Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence that promotes the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of informational text. (RI.8.1)
  • I can analyze full-length novels, short stories, poems, and other genres by authors who represent diverse world cultures. (RL.8.6a)
  • I can interpret, analyze, and evaluate narratives, poetry, and drama, artistically and ethically by making connections to: other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, eras, personal events, and situations. (RL.8.11)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.8.2)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience (W.8.4)
  • I can use evidence from literary texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.8.9)
  • I can write an essay explaining the universal refugee experience of turning ‘inside out’ and ‘back again.’
  • I can cite the strongest evidence from informational texts to support my claims about how refugees turn “inside out” and “back again.”
  • I can cite the strongest evidence from the novel Inside Out & Back Again to support my claims about who Ha is before she flees, and how she is turned “inside out” and “back again.”
  • I can cite where I found my evidence.
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1: First Draft of Analytical Essay
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 18Introducing Final Performance Task and Analyzing Statistics

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine a theme or central idea of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze the connections and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events in a text. (RI.8.3)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.8.1)
  • I can determine the factual details (specific to a time and place in history) that Thanhha Lai used in the poems “Birthday” and “Saigon Is Gone.”
  • I can analyze statistics about refugee experiences around the world in order to notice patterns.
  • Specific Factual Details tickets
  • Chalk Talk participation and discussion
  • Chalk Talk

Lesson 19Launching Researching: Reading for Gist and Gathering Evidence Using the Research Guide

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can conduct short research projects to answer a question. (W.8.7)
  • I can use evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.8.9)
  • I can express my own ideas clearly during discussions, and I can build on other’s ideas during discussions. (SL.8.1)
  • I can find the gist of informational texts.
  • I can select the strongest evidence in an informational text about who the refugees were, where they fled from, and why they had to flee.
  • Research Guide
  • None

Lesson 20End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part Two: Final Draft of Analytical Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.8.2)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use the writing process to ensure that purpose and audience have been addressed. (W.8.5)
  • I can use evidence from literary texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.8.9)
  • I can use teacher feedback to revise my analytical essay to further meet the expectations of the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric.
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Final Draft of Analytical Essay
  • None

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