You are here

ELA G6:M3A:U2

Comparing Varying Points of View of the Same Topic or Event

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Launching the Performance Task: The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use a variety of media to develop and deepen my understanding of a topic or idea. (RI.6.7)
  • I can interpret information presented in different media and formats. (SL.6.2)
  • I can use a photograph, a video, and a text excerpt to find out more about an event.
  • KWL anchor chart
  • None

Lesson 2Introducing “Comprehending the Calamity"

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how key individuals, events, or ideas are developed throughout a text. (RI.6.3)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine word meaning in informational texts. (RI.6.4)
  • I can find the gist of the earthquake excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity.”
  • I can determine the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases in the earthquake excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity.”
  • I can explain how Emma Burke introduces, illustrates, and elaborates on the 1906 San Francisco earthquake in “Comprehending the Calamity.”
  • Structured notes
  • Concentric Circles

Lesson 3Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Earthquake Excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine an author’s point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can explain how an author’s point of view is conveyed in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can identify Emma Burke’s point of view of the earthquake.
  • I can explain how Emma Burke conveys her point of view of the earthquake.
  • Author’s Point of View Graphic Organizer: Earthquake Excerpt
  • None

Lesson 4Finding the Gist of the Immediate Aftermath Excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how key individuals, events, or ideas are developed throughout a text. (RI.6.3)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine word meaning in informational texts. (RI.6.4)
  • I can find the gist of the immediate aftermath excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity.”
  • I can determine the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases in the immediate aftermath excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity.”
  • I can explain how Emma Burke introduces, illustrates, and elaborates on the immediate aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire in “Comprehending the Calamity.”
  • Structured notes
  • None

Lesson 5Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine an author’s point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can explain how an author’s point of view is conveyed in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can identify Emma Burke’s point of view of the immediate aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.
  • I can explain how Emma Burke conveys her point of view of the immediate aftermath the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.
  • Author’s Point of View Graphic Organizer: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt
  • None

Lesson 6Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing the Author’s Point of View: Relief Camps

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how key individuals, events, or ideas are developed throughout a text. (RI.6.3)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine word meaning in informational texts. (RI.6.4)
  • I can determine an author’s point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can explain how an author’s point of view is conveyed in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can determine the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases in an excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity.”
  • I can explain how Emma Burke introduces, illustrates, and elaborates on the relief camps in “Comprehending the Calamity.”
  • I can identify Emma Burke’s point of view of the relief camps in “Comprehending the Calamity.”
  • I can explain how Emma Burke conveys her point of view of the relief camps in “Comprehending the Calamity.”
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment Part A: Determining Word Meaning and How Ideas Are Developed
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment Part B: Determining the Author’s Point of View and How it Is Conveyed
  • None

Lesson 7Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)
  • I can find the gist of the model literary analysis essay.
  • I can determine the main ideas of a model literary analysis essay.
  • Model literary analysis annotations
  • Mix and Mingle class discussion
  • None

Lesson 8Reading for Gist and Analyzing Point of View: Moon Shadow

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine an author’s point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can analyze the structure of a model literary essay.
  • I can identify Moon Shadow’s point of view in an excerpt of Dragonwings.
  • Structured notes
  • Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart
  • Analyzing Moon Shadow’s Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath graphic organizer
  • None

Lesson 9Making a Claim: Emma Burke’s Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath of the Earthquake

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)
  • I can apply grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels; and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics”). (W.6.9a)
  • I can make a claim about Emma Burke’s point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake.
  • I can skillfully select the best evidence to support my claim.
  • I can draft the first body paragraph of my literary analysis essay.
  • Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Emma Burke’s Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath
  • Draft of body paragraph 1 of literary analysis essay
  • None

Lesson 10Making a Claim: Moon Shadow’s Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, and quotations. (W.6.2d)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)
  • I can apply grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels; and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics”). (W.6.9a)
  • I can make a claim about Moon Shadow’s point of view of the immediate aftermath.
  • I can develop my claim using concrete details and quotations.
  • I can draft the second body paragraph of my literary analysis essay.
  • Structured notes
  • Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Moon Shadow’s Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath
  • Draft of body paragraph 2 of literary analysis essay
  • None

Lesson 11Planning for Writing: Introduction and Conclusion of a Literary Analysis Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can introduce the topic of my text. (W.6.2a)
  • I can construct a concluding statement or section of an informative/explanatory text. (W6.2h)
  • I can identify and name key features of a strong introduction and conclusion for a literary analysis essay.
  • I can draft the introduction and conclusion of my literary analysis essay.
  • First draft of literary analysis essay
  • Self-assessment against Rows 1 and 3 of Grade 6 New York State Expository Writing Rubric

 

  • None

Lesson 12Analyzing the Purpose of a Newspaper Article

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the main idea of an informational text based on details in the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can find the gist of a model newspaper article.
  • I can determine the angle of a model newspaper article.
  • I can determine the purpose of a newspaper article and explain what readers expect from a newspaper article.
  • Model newspaper article annotations
  • Team Chalk Talk chart
  • None

Lesson 13Researching Facts

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can conduct short research projects to answer a question. (W.6.7)
  • I can research to find factual information to use in my newspaper article.
  • Researching Factual Information graphic organizer
  • None

Lesson 14End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final Literary Analysis

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to send a clear message to my reader. (L.6.2)
  • I can use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements. (L.6.2a)
  • I can spell correctly. (L.6.2b)

 

  • I can use the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers.
  • I can use teacher feedback to revise my argument essay to further meet the expectations of the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric.
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final Draft of Literary Analysis Essay
  • None

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up