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ELA G6:M2B:U3

Modern Voices of Adversity

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Comparing and Contrasting: Seeing and Hearing Different Genres

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can compare and contrast how reading a story, drama, or poem is different from what I perceive when I listen or watch. (RL.6.7)
  • I can compare and contrast how different genres communicate the same ideas. (RL.6.9)
  • I can compare and contrast the experience of listening to an audio version of the poem “Angels” to reading the same poem.
  • I can compare and contrast how a poem and a news article communicate the same ideas.
  • I can compare and contrast how a song and a monologue communicate the same ideas.
  • Modern Voices graphic organizer for “My Sister is Crazy” (from homework)
  • Venn Diagram: Comparing and Contrasting “Angels” and Audio Version
  • Comparing/Contrasting Genres graphic organizer for “Bad Hair Day” and news article
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s Notes
  • None

Lesson 2Analyzing, Comparing, Sharing: Modern Voices

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can effectively engage in sixth-grade discussions with diverse partners about sixth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.6.1)
  • I can express my own ideas clearly during discussions. (SL.6.1)
  • I can build on others’ ideas during discussion. (SL.6.1)
  • I can discuss concrete poems with diverse partners.
  • I can express my own ideas clearly during discussions.
  • I can build on others’ ideas during discussion. 
  • Comparing Genres graphic organizer for “Jack, the Half-Wit” and “Kyle’s Story” (from homework)
  • Modern Voices graphic organizer for “The Thank-You Letter”
  • “I Think … What Do You Think?” scavenger hunt to identify theme and evidence, infer, and discuss
  • Self-assessment using speaking and listening criteria
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s Notes
  • None

Lesson 3Seeing, Hearing, and Comparing Genres: A Poem and a Letter

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material, and explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. (SL.6.1a)
  • I can follow class norms when I participate in discussions. (SL.6.1b)
  • I can pose questions that help me clarify what is being discussed. (SL.6.1c)
  • I can review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. (SL.6.1d)
  • I can seek to understand and communicate with individuals from different perspectives and cultural backgrounds. (SL.6.1e)
  • I can compare and contrast how reading a story, drama, or poem is different from what I perceive when I listen or watch. (RL.6.7)
  • I can prepare myself to participate in discussions.
  • I can follow class norms when I participate in discussions.
  • I can be involved in discussions by asking and responding to questions.
  • I can demonstrate understanding of different perspectives through reflecting and paraphrasing.
  • I can try to understand and communicate with others who have different ideas and backgrounds.
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s Notes (from homework)
  • Venn Diagram: Comparing and Contrasting: “The Thank-You Letter” and Audio Version
  • Comparing/Contrasting Genres graphic organizer
  • Speaking and Listening Criteria Discussion Tracker
  • None

Lesson 4Mid-Unit Assessment: Small Group Discussion: How Do Modern Poems Portray Modern Adversities?

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can compare and contrast how reading a story, drama, or poem is different from what I perceive when I listen or watch. (RL.6.7)
  • I can compare and contrast how different genres communicate the same theme or idea. (RL.6.9)
  • I can come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material, and explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. (SL.6.1a)
  • I can follow class norms when I participate in discussions. (SL.6.1b)
  • I can pose questions that elaborate on a topic and respond to questions with elaboration. (SL.6.1c)
  • I can review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. (SL.6.1d)
  • I can seek to understand and communicate with individuals from different perspectives and cultural backgrounds. (SL.6.1e)
  • I can compare the experience of reading the poem “Skateboard” to listening to its audio version.
  • I can compare how similar themes are communicated in the poem “Skateboard” and a news article.
  • I can prepare myself to participate in discussions.
  • I can follow class norms when I participate in discussions.
  • I can be involved in discussions by asking and responding to questions.
  • I can demonstrate understanding of different perspectives through reflecting and paraphrasing.
  • I can try to understand and communicate with others who have different ideas and backgrounds.
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (graphic organizers and discussion component)
  • Speaking and Listening Criteria: Class Discussion Tracker
  • None

Lesson 5Introduction: Writing a Narrative of Adversity

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.6.3)
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.6.1)
  • I can describe the criteria for writing a narrative about a theme of adversity.
  • I can identify first-person pronouns to use for a narrator’s voice in a narrative.
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s Notes (from homework)
  • Narrative of Adversity Structure and Content
  • Exit Ticket: Narrative of Adversity Plan Part I
  • None

Lesson 6Writing and Sharing: A Narrative of Adversity Plan

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.6.1)
  • I can use the proper case of pronouns in my writing. (L.6.1)
  • I can establish a context for my narrative. (W.6.3a)
  • I can organize events in a logical sequence. (W.6.3a)
  • I can use dialogue and descriptions to show the actions, thoughts, and feelings of my characters. (W.6.3b)
  • I can describe events and details in the experience of “Jack, the Half-Wit” and “TyrannosaurBus Rex.”
  • I can develop a plan for writing a narrative that includes a context, a narrator, sequenced events, and details.
  • I can use pronouns to establish a narrator’s voice in a narrative.
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s Notes (from homework)
  • Narrative of Adversity Plan Part II graphic organizer
  • None

Lesson 7End of Unit Assessment, Part 1: Drafting the Experience of Event of the Narrative

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.6.3)
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.6.1)
  • I can use a variety of sentence structures to make my writing and speaking more interesting. (L.6.3)
  • I can maintain consistency in style and tone when writing and speaking. (L.6.3)
  • I can draft the experience or event that conveys the modern-day adversity of my narrative.
  • I can use correct grammar and word usage when writing my narrative draft.
  • I can use a variety of sentence structures to create my narrative.
  • I can select and use words and phrases to create tone in my narrative
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s Notes (from homework)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment, Part 1: Giving Voice to Adversity: Drafting a Modern Narrative of Adversity (body paragraphs)
  • Self-assessment: Narrative of Adversity checklist
  • None

Lesson 8End of Unit Assessment, Part 2: Drafting Introduction and Conclusion of a Narrative

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can establish a context for my narrative. (W.6.3a)
  • I can use transitional words, phrases, and clauses to show passage of time in a narrative text. (W.6.3c)
  • I can use precise words and phrases and sensory language to convey experiences and events to my reader. (W.6.3d)
  • I can write a conclusion to my narrative that makes sense to a reader. (W.6.3e)
  • I can use a variety of sentence structures to make my writing and speaking more interesting. (L.6.3)
  • I can maintain consistency in style and tone when writing and speaking. (L.6.3) 
  • I can establish a context and draft the introduction of my narrative.
  • I can draft the conclusion of my narrative.
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s Notes (from homework)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment, Part 2: Giving Voice to Adversity: Drafting a Modern Narrative of Adversity (introduction and conclusion)
  • Self-assessment against the Narrative of Adversity Criteria checklist
  • None

Lesson 9Writing the Final Narrative: Monologue or Concrete Poem

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.6.3)
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.6.1)
  • I can use a variety of sentence structures to make my writing and speaking more interesting. (L.6.3)
  • I can present evidence and details in a logical order. (SL.6.4)
  • I can support my evidence with descriptive details. (SL.6.4)
  • I can use effective speaking techniques, appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. (SL.6.4)
  • I can adapt my speech for a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when indicated or appropriate. (SL.6.6)
  • I can use correct grammar and word usage when writing my narrative.
  • I can use a variety of sentence structures to create my narrative.
  • I can present evidence and details in a logical order in my narrative performance.
  • I can use descriptive details to create an image of the evidence in my narrative.
  • I can use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation to convey the message in my narrative.
  • I can adapt my speech to fit the context of my narrative.
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s Notes
  • Writing of narrative monologue
  • Writing of concrete poem
  • Performance task practice
  • None

Lesson 10Performance Task: Performing a Narrative

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can present evidence and details in a logical order. (SL.6.4)
  • I can support my evidence with descriptive details. (SL.6.4)
  • I can use effective speaking techniques, appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. (SL.6.4)
  • I can adapt my speech for a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when indicated or appropriate. (SL.6.6)
  • I can present evidence and details in a logical order in my narrative performance.
  • I can use descriptive details to create an image of the evidence in my narrative.
  • I can use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation to convey the message in my narrative performance. 
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s Notes
  • Final drafts of narratives
  • Performance of narrative monologues
  • Performance of concrete poems
  • Narrative Rubric: Self-assessment
  • None

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