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ELA G6:M2B:U2

Monologues, Language, and Literary Argument: Voices of Medieval Village

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Launching the Book: Good Master! Sweet Ladies!

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can describe how a monologue is used to convey a theme. 
  • Conveying Theme anchor chart
  • None

Lesson 2Close Read, Part 1: “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can analyze figurative language word relationships and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)
  • I can interpret figures of speech in context. (L.6.5a)
  • I can use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words. (L.6.5b)
  • I can distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions). (L.6.5c)

 

  • I can read the monologue “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew” for flow and for gist.
  • I can determine the themes of the monologue “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew.” 
  • Reading for gist notes
  • Theme of Adversity graphic organizer for “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew”
  • None

Lesson 3Close Read, Part 2: “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can analyze figurative language word relationships and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)
  • I can interpret figures of speech in context. (L.6.5a)
  • I can use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words. (L.6.5b)
  • I can distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions). (L.6.5c)
  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in the monologue “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew.”
  • I can analyze how the author’s word choice affects the tone of the monologue “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew.”
  • I can analyze how a single stanza (or sentence) adds to the whole monologue. 
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “Giles, the Beggar” (from homework)
  • Figurative Language graphic organizer for “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew”
  • Close Reading Guide: “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew”
  • Exit Ticket: Give One, Get One—Word Choice
  • None

Lesson 4Close Read, Part 1: “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words. (L.6.5b)
  • I can distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions). (L.6.5c)
  • I can read the monologue “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter” for flow and for gist.
  • I can determine the themes of the monologue “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter.”
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “Thomas, the Doctor’s Son” (from homework)
  • Reading for gist notes
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter”
  • None

Lesson 5Close Read, Part 2: “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relations, and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)
  • I can interpret figures of speech in context. (L.6.5a)
  • I can use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words. (L.6.5b)
  • I can distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions). (L.6.5c)
  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in the monologue “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter.”
  • I can analyze how the author’s word choice affects the tone of the monologue “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter.”
  • I can analyze how a single stanza (or sentence) adds to the whole monologue.
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “Mogg, the Villein’s Daughter” (from homework)
  • Figurative Language graphic organizer for “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter”
  • Text-Dependent Questions: “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter”
  • Exit Ticket: Literal to Figurative, Simile and Metaphors
  • None

Lesson 6Jigsaw, Part 1: Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can read my Jigsaw monologue for flow and for gist.
  • I can determine a theme based on details in my Jigsaw monologue.
  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in a monologue.
  • Annotated notes for gist
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “Jack, the Half-Wit” (from homework)
  • Figurative Language graphic organizer for “Constance, the Pilgrim.” 
  • Back-to-back and Face-to-Face

Lesson 7Jigsaw, Part 2: Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)
  • I can interpret figures of speech in context. (e.g., personification). (L.6.5a)
  • I can use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words. (e.g., cause/effect, part/whole, item/category). (L.6.5b)
  • I can distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., stingy, scrimping, economical, unwasteful, thrifty). (L.6.5c)
  • I can analyze how the author’s word choice affects the tone of the monologue.
  • I can analyze how a single stanza adds to the whole monologue.
  • I can present to my peers themes of adversity, figurative language and interpret its literal meaning, how word choice affects tone, and how a stanza contributes to theme in a monologue.
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “Jacob Ben Salomon, the Moneylender’s Son and Petronella, the Merchant’s Daughter” (from homework)
  • Text-dependent questions for “Will, the Plowboy,” “Otho, the Miller’s Son,” “Lowdy, the Varlet’s Daughter,” and “Constance, the Pilgrim”
  • Exit Ticket: How Has the Author Helped Us Get to Know the Children of Medieval Times? 
  • None

Lesson 8Mid-Unit Assessment: Theme, Figurative Language, and Word Choice in Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can summarize a literary text using only information from the text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)
  • I can interpret figures of speech in context (e.g., personification). (L.6.5a)
  • I can use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words (e.g., cause/effect, part/whole, item/category).(L.6.5b)
  • I can distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., stingy, scrimping, economical, unwasteful, thrifty). (L.6.5c)
  • I can read the monologue “Pask, the Runaway” for flow and for gist.
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the monologue “Pask, the Runaway.”
  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in the monologue “Pask, the Runaway.”
  • I can analyze how the author’s word choice affects the tone of the monologue “Pask, the Runaway.”
  • I can analyze how a single stanza adds to the whole monologue.
  • Mid-Unit Assessment: Theme, Figurative Language, and Word Choice
  • None

Lesson 9Qualities of a Strong Literacy Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)
  • I can describe the qualities of a literary argument essay.
  • I can analyze how evidence from the text supports a claim in a model essay.
  • Model essay text-coded to show claim ©, text evidence (T), examples from life today (L), and explanation (E)
  • None

Lesson 10Revisiting the Text: What Are the Adversities They Face?

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)
  • I can make a claim to answer the question in the assessment prompt.
  • I can evaluate evidence to choose the most compelling and relevant for my literary argument essay. 
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “Simon, the Knight’s Son” (from homework)
  • Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer
  • None

Lesson 11Examples from Life Today

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)
  • I can select examples from today to support the text evidence I have selected.
  • I can explain why I have chosen the evidence and examples from life today to support my claim.
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “A Little Background: The Crusades” (from homework)
  • Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer
  • None

Lesson 12Writing: Drafting Body Paragraphs and Revising for Language

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)
  • I can accurately use sixth-grade academic vocabulary to express my ideas. (L.6.6)
  • I can draft the body paragraphs of my literary argument essay.
  • I can use precise and domain-specific language to formally argue my claim.
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “Isobel, the Lord’s Daughter” (from homework)
  • Draft of body paragraphs
  • None

Lesson 13Planning for Writing: Introduction and Conclusion of a Literary Argument Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)
  • I can draft the introduction and conclusion of my literary argument essay.
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “Nelly, the Sniggler” (from homework)
  • First draft of argument essay
  • Self-assessment against Rows 1 and 3 of Literary Argument Essay Rubric
  • None

Lesson 14Launching Modern Voices: Concrete Poetry

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence to support analysis of what text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can determine a theme or central idea and how it is conveyed through particular details. (RL.6.2)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can express my own ideas clearly and build on others’ ideas during discussion. (SL.6.1)
  • I can cite evidence to analyze what poems say explicitly and what inferences can be made from poems in Technically, It’s Not My Fault and Blue Lipstick.
  • I can determine theme and how it is conveyed through particular details in concrete poems.
  • I can describe the structure of poems on the covers of Technically, It’s Not My Fault and Blue Lipstick.
  • I can express my own ideas and build on others’ ideas during discussion.
  • Modern Voices graphic organizer
  • None

Lesson 15Analyzing and Discussing: Modern Voices

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can cite text-based evidence to support analysis of what a text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from a literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can determine a theme or central idea and how it is conveyed through particular details. (RL.6.2)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can effectively engage in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on sixth-grade topics, texts and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing my own clearly. (SL.6.1)
  • I can cite evidence to analyze what poems says explicitly and what inferences can be made from poems in Technically, It’s Not My Fault and Blue Lipstick.
  • I can describe how the structure of the poems “TyrannosaurBus Rex” and “Point A to Point B” in Technically, It’s Not My Fault and Blue Lipstick contributes to the theme.
  • I can express my own ideas and build on others’ ideas during discussion of “Advanced English.”
  • Modern Voices graphic organizer for “Advanced English” (from homework)
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s Notes
  • Speaking and Listening Criteria Discussion Tracker
  • None

Lesson 16End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final Draft of Literary Argument Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.6.1)
  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to send a clear message to my reader. (L.6.2)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use the writing process to ensure that purpose and audience have been addressed. (W.6.5)
  • I can use the Literary Argument Essay rubric to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers.
  • I can use teacher feedback to revise my argument essay to further meet the expectations of the Literary Argument Essay rubric. 
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for “Drogo, the Tanner’s Apprentice” (from homework)
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final draft of literary argument essay 
  • None

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