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ELA G6:M1:U3

Culminating Project: My Hero’s Journey Narrative

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1“The Hero’s Journey”: Using a Graphic Organizer to Deconstruct Percy Jackson’s Hero’s Journey and Plan a New Hero’s Journey Narrative

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can describe how the plot evolves throughout a literary text. (RL.6.3)
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense:

    a. I can establish a context for my narrative. (W.6.3)

    c. I can organize events in a logical sequence. (W.6.3)

  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about sixth- grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.6.1)

  • I can use “The Hero’s Journey” to describe how Percy Jackson’s adventures in The Lightning Thief follow the hero’s journey archetype.
  • I can use the Narrative Story Line—Hero’s Journey graphic organizer to begin to plan my own hero’s journey narrative.
  • Narrative Story Line—Hero’s Journey graphic organizer (completed with Percy Jackson’s hero’s journey)
  • Narrative Story Line—Hero’s Journey graphic organizer (completed with ideas for students’ own hero’s journey narrative)
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 2“The Hero’s Journey”: Analyzing a Model Narrative and Continuing to Plan a New Hero’s Journey Narrative

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can describe how the plot evolves throughout a literary text. (RL.6.3)
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.6.3)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about sixth- grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.6.1)
  • I can analyze the story line of the model narrative.
  • I can use “The Hero’s Journey” to describe how the model narrative follows the hero’s journey archetype.
  • I can use the notes on my Narrative Story Line—Hero’s Journey graphic organizer to begin to plan my own hero’s journey narrative.
  • Exit Ticket: Hero’s Profile (from Lesson 1)
  • Narrative Story Line—Hero’s Journey graphic organizer (completed with the model narrative’s hero’s journey)
  • Narrative Story Line—Hero’s Journey graphic organizer (completed with ideas for their own hero’s journey narrative)
  • Hero’s Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer
  • Mix and Mingle

Lesson 3Mid-Unit Assessment and Establishing a Context for My Hero’s Journey Narrative

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.6.3)
  • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)
  • I can explain in writing how my plan for a hero’s journey narrative aligns with the archetype for “The Hero’s Journey.”
  • I can establish a context for my hero’s journey narrative in a way that engages and orients the reader.
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Crosswalk between My Hero’s Journey Narrative and “The Hero’s Journey” Informational Text
  • Hero’s Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer
  • None

Lesson 4Writing: Getting Feedback, Setting Goals, and Drafting

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.6.3)
  • I can use feedback from my End of Unit 2 Assessment to set goals for myself as a writer.
  • I can use feedback from my Hero’s Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer to make revisions to my plan.
  • I can use my plan to draft my hero’s journey narrative.
  • Exit ticket: Narrative Story Line—Checking My Progress
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 5Writing to Show, Not Tell: Dialogue, Sensory Words, and Strong Action Verbs

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. (W.6.3)

    b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and descriptions to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

    d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events.

  • I can use precise words and phrases and sensory language to convey experiences and events in my hero’s journey narrative.
  • Draft narratives
  • Exit ticket: How Do Writers Make Their Stories Show, Not Tell?
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 6Writing: Analyzing the Conclusion of “The Golden Key” and Drafting a Compelling Conclusion for the Hero’s Journey Narrative

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense.

    e. I can write a conclusion to my narrative that makes sense to a reader. (W.6.3)

  • I can list the similarities and differences between the conclusion of an analytical piece of writing and the conclusion of a narrative.
  • I can analyze the conclusion of the model narrative, “The Golden Key,” to identify the qualities that make it compelling.
  • I can write a compelling conclusion for my hero’s journey narrative.
  • I can use criteria to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers.
  • Venn Diagram: Similarities and Differences between Conclusions in Analytical Writing and Narratives
  • Draft hero’s journey narrative conclusion
  • What Makes the Conclusion of “The Golden Key” Compelling? note-catcher
  • Narrative Conclusion: Stars and Steps recording form
  • Peer Critique

Lesson 7End of Unit Assessment—Final Draft of Hero’s Journey Narrative

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.6.3)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • I can use transitional words and phrases to move my story from one moment to the next.
  • I can use my draft to write a final, best version of my hero’s journey narrative.
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Final Draft of Hero’s Journey Narrative

 

  • None

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