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ELA G5:M2A:U2

Case Study: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World and the Work of Rainforest Scientist Meg Lowman

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Introduction to The Most Beautiful Roof in the World: Why does Meg Lowman Research the Rainforest? (Pages 2–4)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can make inferences using quotes from the text. (RI.5.1)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of academic words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can determine the meaning of content words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can compare and contrast the organizational structure of different informational texts. (RI.5.5)
  • I can follow our class norms when I participate in a conversation. (SL.5.1)
  • I can make inferences about Meg Lowman, a rainforest scientist.
  • I can explain which features of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World make it an informational text. 
  • I can determine what motivated Meg Lowman to become a rainforest scientist using details from the text as evidence.
  • I can determine the meaning of new words in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.
  • I can actively listen to my group members during discussions.
  • Journal (Meg Lowman KWL chart)
  • Meg Lowman Note-catcher
  • Inner Circle/Outer Circle (Concentric Circles)

Lesson 2Reading and Writing About How to Perform a Process: How Meg Lowman Studies the Rainforest (Pages 4–8)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can explain how authors use evidence and reasons to support their points in informational texts. (RI.5.8)
  • I can produce clear and cohere ) nt writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.5.4)
  • I can use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) to help me understand the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.5.4)
  • I can connect my questions and responses to what others say
  • I can determine the process Meg Lowman uses to preserve specimens.
  • I can list the steps to preserving a specimen from the natural world. 
  • I can contribute to my group’s discussion by giving suggestions that are on topic.
  • I can determine the meaning of new words from context in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.
  • I can follow steps for collecting and preserving specimens.
  • Steps to Preserve a Specimen Note-catcher
  • Preserved specimen
  • Quiz-Quiz-Trade

Lesson 3Supporting an Opinion: Why is the Rainforest Canopy a Difficult Place to Research? (Pages 9–10)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can explain important relationships between people, events, and ideas in a historical, scientific, or technical text using specific details in the text. (RI.5.3)
  • I can write an opinion piece that supports a point of view with reasons and information. (W.5.1)
  • I can make inferences using quotes from the text. (RI.5.1)
  • I can explain why the canopy is a difficult place to research.
  • I can identify the skills needed by scientists in order to study the rainforest canopy.
  • I can determine the meaning of new words from context in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.
  • I can write an opinion about being a rainforest scientist that is supported by reasons from the text.
  • I can infer what skills Meg Lowman must have in order to be a rainforest scientist.
  • Journal (Meg Lowman KWL chart, Close Read Note-catcher, glossaries)
  • None

Lesson 4Close Reading: Blue Creek, a Rainforest in Belize (Page 12)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of academic words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can determine the meaning of content words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can explain how authors use evidence and reasons to support their points in informational texts. (RI.5.8) 
  • I can explain how the Blue Creek rainforest is biodiverse.

  • I can explain how Kathryn Lasky uses language to paint a picture for the reader about biodiversity in the Blue Creek rainforest.

  • I can determine the meaning of new words in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World

  • Journal (AQUA Biodiversity anchor chart, glossaries)

  • Text-dependent questions 

  • Think-Pair-Share
  • Chalk Talk

Lesson 5Close Reading in Expert Groups: What Is It Like in the Rainforest Canopy? (Pages 13–16)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) to help me understand the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.5.4)
  • I can summarize information that is presented in pictures. (SL.5.2)
  • I can write a gist statement for a chunk of texts from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.

  • I can determine the meaning of new words from context in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.

  • I can sketch the gist of a chunk of text from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.

  • I can match a gist statement to a picture of the same chunk of text. 

  • Journal (Meg Lowman KWL chart, Biodiversity AQUA chart, glossaries)

  • Gist statements

  • Gist sketches 

  • Think-Pair-Share
  • Jigsaw

Lesson 6Reading Informational Text for Details: Meg’s Rainforest Experiment (Pages 17–20)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships, comparisons in text) to help me understand the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.5.4)
  • I can summarize text that is read aloud to me. (SL.5.2)
  • I can explain Meg Lowman’s process for conducting experiments in the rainforest.

  • I can determine the meaning of new words from context in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.

  • Journal (Meg Lowman KWL chart, glossaries)

  • Experiment Note-catcher 

  • Quiz-Quiz-Trade

Lesson 7Mid-Unit Assessment: Text-Dependent Multiple-Choice and Short-Answer Assessment

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RI.5.1)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of academic words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can determine the meaning of content words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) to help me understand the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.5.4) 
  • I can determine the meaning of new words from context in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.

  • I can determine the main ideas of a selection of text from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.

  • I can justify my answers using quotes and evidence from the text.

  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment

  • Tracking My Progress, Mid-Unit 2 recording form 

  • None

Lesson 8Close Read: Epiphytes of the Rainforest and the Creatures That Call Them Home (Pages 24–26)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RI.5.1)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can explain important relationships between people, events, and ideas in a historical, scientific, or technical text using specific details in the text. (RI.5.3)
  • I can use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) to help me understand the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.5.4) 
  • I can determine the meaning of new words from context in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.

  • I can explain the relationship between animals and plants in the rainforest using evidence from the text.

  • I can synthesize what I read in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World

  • Journal (Close Read Note-catcher, AQUA Biodiversity chart, synthesis statement) 
  • None

Lesson 9A Rainforest Folktale: Determining the Message of “The Wings of the Butterfly,” a Tukuna People Tale

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can summarize text that is read aloud to me. (SL.5.2)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can summarize a literary text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in text. (RL.5.4)
  • I can describe how a narrator’s point of view influences the description of events. (RL.5.6) 
  • I can summarize “The Wings of the Butterfly.”

  • I can explain the message of “The Wings of the Butterfly.”

  • I can determine the meaning of new words in “The Wings of the Butterfly.”

  • I can compare and contrast examples of biodiversity from a story to what we have learned from informational text. 

  • Journal (AQUA Biodiversity chart, glossaries)

  • Double-Bubble map 

  • Tea Party

Lesson 10Reading for Details: Taking an Inventory in the Rainforest (Pages 28–31)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can explain important relationships between people, events, and ideas in a historical, scientific, or technical text using specific details in the text. (RI.5.3)
  • I can use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) to help me understand the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.5.4)
  • I can draw on information to explore ideas in the discussion. (SL.5.1) 
  • I can explain the purpose of a column study in the rainforest.

  • I can identify the types and numbers of species counted during the column study done by Meg Lowman.

  • I can use my group members’ ideas to help me determine the inventory count of the column study.

  • I can determine the meaning of new words from context in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World

  • Journal (Meg Lowman KWL chart, AQUA Biodiversity chart, glossaries, answers to the questions)

  • Inventory Count Note-catcher 

  • None

Lesson 11Reading for Fluency: Readers Theater about the Rainforest (Page 33)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can read fifth-grade texts with purpose and understanding. (RF.5.4)
  • I can read fifth-grade texts with fluency. (RF.5.4)
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences or events. (W.5.3)
  • I can show the actions, thoughts, and feelings of my characters through dialogue, description, and careful pacing. (W.5.3)
  • I can speak clearly and at an understandable pace. (SL.5.4)
  • I can adapt my speech for a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate. (SL.5.6) 
  • I can read my speaker’s lines with fluency.

  • I can write lines for my character using the text from The Most Beautiful Roof in the World.

  • I can speak clearly and with appropriate emotion for my character. 

  • Journal (Meg Lowman KWL chart, AQUA Biodiversity chart, glossaries)

  • Mini Readers Theater

  • Triad Feedback rubric 

  • None

Lesson 12Comparing Two Main Ideas in an Informational Text: Meg Lowman’s Methods for Researching the Rainforest (Pages 35–36)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RI.5.1)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of academic words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can determine the meaning of content words or phrases in an informational text. (RI. 5.4)
  • I can compare and contrast different research methods that Meg Lowman has used.

  • I can use quotes from the text as evidence in my answers to questions.

  • I can determine the meaning of new words in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World

  • Journal (Meg Lowman KWL chart, AQUA Biodiversity chart, glossaries)

  • Text-dependent questions

  • Four Corners exit ticket 

  • None

Lesson 13Interviewing Meg Lowman: What Does it Mean to be a Responsible Scientist? (Pages 37–39)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can make inferences using quotes from the text. (RI.5.1)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can explain important relationships between people, events, and ideas in a historical, scientific, or technical text using specific details in the text. (RI.5.3)
  • I can develop the topic with facts, definitions, details, and quotations. (W.5.2)
  • I can use precise, content-specific vocabulary to inform or explain about a topic. (W.5.2)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.5.4)
  • I can explain what happened during the night walk.
  • I can write interview questions for Meg Lowman about the rainforest spider from the point of view of a scientist, using scientific vocabulary.
  • I can create answers to interview questions by inferring how Meg Lowman would answer them.
  • I can revise interview question and answers, given feedback from my peers.
  • Journal (Meg Lowman KWL chart, AQUA Biodiversity chart, glossaries)
  • Interview
  • Praise-Question-Suggest

Lesson 14Analyzing How Rainforest Scientists Communicate Their Research (Pages 39–42)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RI.5.1)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of academic words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can determine the meaning of content words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can explain how Meg Lowman communicates her research.

  • I can explain biodiversity by using quotes from the text.

  • I can determine ways to explain biodiversity to others.

  • I can determine the meaning of new words in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World

  • Journal (Meg Lowman KWL chart, AQUA Biodiversity anchor chart, glossaries) 
  • None

Lesson 15End of Unit Assessment: On-Demand Analysis of Meg Lowman’s Research in the Rainforest

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts. (W.5.2)
  • I can use precise, content-specific vocabulary to inform or explain about a topic. (W.5.2)
  • I can choose evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.5.9) (W.5.4) 
  • I can analyze Meg Lowman’s research in the rainforest.

  • I can justify my analysis by citing evidence from the text.

  • I can use academic and scientific vocabulary accurately in my writing.

  • I can reflect on my learning. 

  • End of Unit 2 Assessment

  • Tracking My Progress, End of Unit 2 recording form 

  • None

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