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ELA G5:M2A

Biodiversity in Rainforests of the Western Hemisphere

Each module is approximately 8 weeks of instruction broken into 3 units. The "week at a glance" chart in the curriculum map gives the big picture, breaking down the module into a detailed week-by-week view. It shows how the module unfolds, the focus of each week of instruction, and where the six assessments and the performance task occur.

Weeks 1-2 Unit 1: How Scientists Communicate about the Living Things of the Rainforest

Instructional FocusLong-Term TargetsAssessments
  • Building Background Knowledge: Examining the Unique Living Things of the Rainforests and the Scientists Who Study Them
  • Reading an Interview: “Sloth Canopy Researcher: Bryson Voirin”
  • Continued Close Read of “Sloth Canopy Researcher: Bryson Voirin” plus Identifying My Learning Style
  • Summarizing Informational Text (an Article): “Hawaii’s Endangered Happy Face Spider”
  • Informational Text Features: Analyzing “Hawaii’s Endangered Happy Face Spider”
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RI.5.1)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can explain important relationships between ideas in a scientific text using specific details in the text. (RI.5.3)
  • I can compare and contrast the organizational structure of different informational texts. (RI.5.5)
  • I can use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships, comparisons in text) to help me understand the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.5.4)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing an Interview with a Rainforest Scientist Part 1 (NYSP12 ELA CCLS RI.5.1, RI.5.2, RI.5.3, RI.5.5, and L.5.4)
  • Analyzing Documentary Videos: “Great Bear Rainforest Remote Camera Project” British Columbia, Canada
  • Synthesizing Information: Living Things in the Rainforest
  • Science Talk
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RI.5.1)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of academic words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can determine the meaning of content words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can compare and contrast the organizational structure of different informational texts.
  • (RI.5.5)
  • I can accurately synthesize information from multiple texts on the same topic. (RI.5.9)
  • I can write an opinion piece and identify reasons to support my opinion. (W.5.1)
  • End-of-Unit 1 Assessment: Interview with a Rainforest Scientist Part 2 and Comparing and Contrasting Texts About Rainforest Biodiversity (NYSP12 ELA CCLS RI.5.1, RI.5.2, RI.5.4, RI.5.5, RI.5.9 and W.5.1)

Weeks 3-5 Unit 2: Case Study: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World and the Work of Rainforest Scientist Meg Lowman

Instructional FocusLong-Term TargetsAssessments
  • Introduction to The Most Beautiful Roof in the World: Why Does Meg Lowman Research the Rainforest?
  • Writing about How to Perform a Process: How Meg Lowman Studies the Rainforest
  • Supporting an Opinion: Why Is the Rainforest Canopy a Difficult Place to Research?
  • Close Reading in Expert Groups: What Is It Like in the Rainforest Canopy?
  • Reading Informational Text for Details: Meg’s Rainforest Experiment
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RI.5.1)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of academic words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can determine the meaning of content words or phrases in an informational text. (RI.5.4)
  • I can use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships, comparisons in text) to help me understand the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.5.4)
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: The Most Beautiful Roof in the World Quiz  (NYSP12 ELA CCLS RI.5.1, RI.5.2, RI.5.4, L.5.4)
  • Comparing Literary and Informational Text: “The Wings of the Butterfly: A Tale of the Amazon Rainforest”
  • Reading for Details: Taking an Inventory in the Rainforest
  • Reading for Fluency: Readers Theater about the Rainforest
  • Interviewing Meg Lowman: What Does It Mean to Be a Responsible Scientist?
  • Analyzing How Rainforest Scientists Communicate Their Research
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and information clearly. (W.5.2)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.5.4)
  • I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.5.8)
  • I can summarize or paraphrase information in my notes and in finished work. (W.5.8)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.5.9)
  • End of Unit 2: On-Demand Analysis of Meg Lowman’s Research in the Rainforest (NYSP12 ELA CCLS W.5.2, W.5.4, W.5.8, and W.5.9)

Weeks 6-8 Unit 3: Reading and Writing Like a Scientist: Observing Nature, Conducting Research, and Creating a Field Journal Entry

Instructional FocusLong-Term TargetsAssessments
  • How Scientists Write in the Field: Introduction to the Features of Field Journals
  • Learning to Observe Closely and Record Accurately: How to Create a Field Journal
  • Journaling about the Rainforest
  • Taking Notes and Citing Quotes from Text: Gathering Information on Rainforest Arthropods
  • Structuring Our Research: Categorizing Information
  • Becoming Experts: Gathering Information on Rainforest Arthropods
  • Conducting Research: Drawing on a Variety of Sources to Capture Information about My Arthropod
  • I can use quotes to explain the meaning of informational texts. (RI.5.1)
  • I can use quotes to support my inferences in informational texts. (RI.5.2)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to locate an answer or solve a problem efficiently in informational texts. (RI.5.7)
  • I can use a variety of sources to develop an understanding of a topic. (RI.5.9)
  • I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.5.8)
  • I can document what I learn about a topic by providing a list of sources. (W.5.8)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.5.9)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: On-Demand Note-Taking about Howler Monkeys (NYSP12 ELA CCLS RI.5.1, RI.5.2, RI.5.7, W.5.8, and W.5.9)
  • Reflection and Re-Teaching: Tracking Progress toward Learning Targets
  • Making Inferences about Informational Text: Science Talk on How My Arthropod Contributes to the Rainforest Ecosystem
  • Blending Informative and Narrative Writing: Transforming Research Notes into Field Journals
  • Writing and Revising Our Texts: Using Peer Critique to Improve First Drafts
  • Summarizing Our Research: Creating Informational Text Boxes
  • Revising and Polishing Our Field Journal Pages
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and information clearly. (W.5.2)
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences or events. (W.5.3)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.5.4)
  • I can build knowledge about multiple aspects of a topic by conducting research. (W.5.7)
  • I can use several sources to build my knowledge about a topic. (W.5.7)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.5.9)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Writing a Field Journal Excerpt on Howler Monkeys (NYSCCSS W.5.2, W.5.3, W.5.4, W.5.7, W.5.9)

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