You are here

ELA G5:M1:U2

Case Study: Esperanza’s Story

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Building Background Knowledge: Learning About the Historical and Geographical Setting of Esperanza Rising (Chapter 1: “Aguascalientes, Mexico, 1924”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can summarize a literary text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in text. (RL.5.4)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.5)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.5)
  • I can define historical fiction.
  • I can describe the geographical setting of Esperanza Rising
  • I can describe the historical setting of Esperanza Rising.
  • Class discussion

  • Building Background Knowledge: I Notice and I Wonder sticky notes

  • Notes from Jigsaw note-catcher
  • Jigsaw

Lesson 2Getting to Know Esperanza (Chapter 2: “Las Uvas/Grapes”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can effectively engage in a discussion with my peers. (SL.5.1)
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can make inferences using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text (two or more characters’ points of view, settings, events). (RL.5.3)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in text. (RL.5.4)
  • I can discuss answers to questions with my triad and provide evidence to explain my ideas.
  • I can answer questions about the setting of the novel Esperanza Rising based on evidence from the text. 
  • I can answer questions about the main character, Esperanza, based on evidence from the text.
  • Observe where students place their evidence flags
  • Triad discussions
  • None

Lesson 3Inferring About Characters Based on How They Respond to Challenges (Chapter 3: “Las Papayas/Papayas”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can make inferences using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes). (RL.5.4)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts. (W.5.2)
  • I can answer comprehension questions based on text from Esperanza Rising that I have read independently.
  • I can identify situations in Esperanza Rising where a character’s human rights are challenged.
  • I can make inferences from the text about Esperanza, Mama, and Abuelita. 
  • I can use context clues to help me determine the meaning of words in Esperanza Rising
  • I can write to explain my thinking about the characters in Esperanza Rising.
  • 3: “Las Papayas/Papayas” (entrance ticket) 
  • Triad discussions
  • Exit Ticket: Independent answer to text-dependent question
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 4Inferring About Characters Based on How They Respond to Challenges (Chapter 4: “Los Higos/Figs”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can make inferences using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text (two or more characters’ points of view, settings, events). (RL.5.3)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes). (RL.5.4)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts. (W.5.2)
  • I can answer comprehension questions based on text from Esperanza Rising that I have read independently.
  • I can identify situations in Esperanza Rising where a character’s human rights are challenged.
  • I can make inferences from the text about the characters in Esperanza Rising. 
  • I can use context clues to help me determine the meaning of words in Esperanza Rising
  • I can write to explain my thinking about the characters in Esperanza Rising.
  • Comprehension Quiz, Chapter 4: “Los Higos/Figs” (entrance ticket)
  • Anchor charts: Character T-charts: one (created by small groups) about Mama, Abuelita, Miguel, and a second (from individual notes) about Mama, Abuelita, Miguel, Esperanza
  • Triad discussions
  • Exit Ticket: Independent answer to text-dependent question
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Jigsaw

Lesson 5Connecting Informational Text with Literature: Building Background Knowledge About Mexican Immigration, California, and the Great Depression

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use quotes to explain the meaning of a literary text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can answer comprehension questions based on text from Esperanza Rising that I have read independently.
  • I can summarize the main ideas in an informational text about California in the 1930s.
  • Comprehension Quiz, Chapter 5: “Las Guayabas/Guavas” (entrance ticket)
  • Getting the Gist note-catchers
  • Exit Ticket: Independent answer to text-dependent question
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Gallery Walk

Lesson 6Contrasting Two Settings (Chapter 6: “Los Melones/Cantaloupes”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can make inferences using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text (two or more characters’ points of view, settings, events). (RL.5.3)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in text. (RL.5.4) 
  • I can effectively engage in a discussion with my peers. (SL.5.1)
  • I can answer comprehension questions based on text from Esperanza Rising that I have read independently.
  • I can discuss answers to questions with my triad and provide evidence to explain my ideas.
  • I can answer questions about the setting of the novel Esperanza Rising based on evidence from the text. 
  • I can answer questions about the main character, Esperanza, based on evidence from the text.
  • I can identify metaphors in Esperanza Rising.
  • I can interpret figurative language in Esperanza Rising.
  • Comprehension Quiz, Chapter 6: “Los Melones/Cantaloupes” (entrance ticket)
  • Observe where students place their evidence flags
  • Triad discussions
  • Exit Ticket: Independent answer to text-dependent question
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 7Point of View: Comparing Esperanza’s and Isabel’s Perspectives About Life in the Camp (Chapter 7: “Las Cebollas/Onions”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text (two or more characters’ points of view, settings, events). (RL.5.3)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language in text. (RL.5.4)
  • I can use what the text says to help me understand the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.5.4)
  • I can answer comprehension questions based on text from Esperanza Rising that I have read independently.
  • I can use context clues to help me determine why the author chose specific words in Esperanza Rising. 
  • I can determine what metaphors the symbols of the chapter titles represent in Esperanza Rising. 
  • I can explain how Isabel responds to challenges in her life.
  • I can describe how the points of view of Esperanza and Isabel influence the description of events. 
  • I can create a visual image of the setting of Esperanza Rising.
  • Comprehension Quiz, Chapter 7: “Las Cebollas/Onions” (entrance ticket)
  • Observation of placement of evidence flags (homework and classwork)
  • Character T-chart (Isabel)
  • Triad discussion
  • Exit ticket: Independent answer to text-dependent question
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 8Understanding Themes in Esperanza Rising

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in text. (RL.5.4) 
  • I can use quotes to explain the meaning of literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can use quotes to support my inferences in literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can interpret two big metaphors in Chapter 8, “Las Almendras,” in Esperanza Rising
  • I can explain what it means to find the theme of a book or story. 
  • I can identify themes in Esperanza Rising.
  • Comprehension Quiz, Chapter 8: “Las Almendras/Almonds” (entrance ticket) 
  • Observation of placement of evidence flags (homework and classwork)
  • Triad discussion 
  • Exit ticket: Independent answer to text-dependent question
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 9Mid-Unit 2 Assessment and Discussing Themes in Esperanza Rising (Chapter 9: “Las Ciruelas/Plums”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use quotes to explain the meaning of literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can use quotes to support my inferences in literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text (two or more characters’ points of view, settings, events). (RL.5.3) 
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in text. (RL.5.4)
  • I can use context clues to help me determine why the author chose specific words in Esperanza Rising
  • I can explain how characters respond to challenges in their lives.
  • I can describe how the points of view of Esperanza and other characters influence the description of events. 
  • I can interpret the “blanket” metaphor in Esperanza Rising.
  • I can identify themes in Esperanza Rising.
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing Sections of Esperanza Rising on My Own 
  • Triad/quad discussion
  • Final Word Fishbowl Discussion

Lesson 10Characters Changing Over Time (Chapter 10: “Las Papas/Potatoes”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can make inferences using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text (two or more characters’ points of view, settings, events). (RL.5.3)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes). (RL.5.4)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can answer comprehension questions based on text from Esperanza Rising that I have read independently.
  • I can make inferences from the text about Esperanza and Mama in Esperanza Rising
  • I can begin to describe how Esperanza is changing. 
  • I can interpret big metaphors in Esperanza Rising
  • I can identify themes in Esperanza Rising.
  • Comprehension Quiz, Chapter 10: “Las Papas/Potatoes” (entrance ticket) 
  • Observe where students place evidence flags
  • Triad discussions
  • Exit Ticket: Independent answer to text-dependent question
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 11Building Background Knowledge: Why Do Workers Strike? (Chapter 11: “Los Aguacates/Avocados”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the main idea(s) of an informational text based on key details. (RI.5.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text. (RI.5.2)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can answer comprehension questions based on text from Esperanza Rising that I have read independently.
  • I can identify examples of human rights that have not been protected in Esperanza Rising.
  • I can explain what a strike is. 
  • I can explain why workers go on strike.
  • Comprehension Quiz, Chapter 11: “Los Aguacates/Avocados” (entrance ticket)
  • Triad discussion 
  • Exit ticket: On Strike! note-catcher
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 12Contrasting Perspectives: Should the Farmworkers in Esperanza Rising Go On Strike? (Chapter 12: “Los Espárragos/Asparagus”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using quotes from the material. (RL.5.1)
  • I can make inferences using quotes from the text. (RL.5.1)
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text (two or more characters’ points of view, settings, events). (RL.5.3)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts. (W.5.2)
  • I can explain why workers go on strike.
  • I can make arguments for and against striking.
  • I can make inferences from the text about the characters in Esperanza Rising. 
  • I can write to explain my thinking about the characters’ perspectives in Esperanza Rising.
  • Comprehension Quiz, Chapter 12: “Los Espárragos/Asparagus” (entrance ticket)
  • Observe where students place evidence flags
  • Triad discussion 
  • Character anchor charts
  • Exit Ticket: independent answer to text-dependent question
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Jigsaw

Lesson 13Gathering Evidence and Drafting a Two-Voice Poem (Chapter 13: “Los Duraznos/Peaches”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use quotes to support my inferences in literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text (two or more characters’ points of view, settings, events). (RL.5.3) I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in text. (RL.5.4)
  • I can describe how a narrator’s point of view influences the description of events. (RL.5.6)
  • I can effectively engage in a discussion with my peers. (SL.1)
  • I can answer comprehension questions based on text from Esperanza Rising that I have read independently. * I can explain the structure of a two-voice poem.
  • I can compare and contrast Esperanza to another main character in Esperanza Rising.
  • I can use evidence from Esperanza Rising that supports my inferences about two different characters, particularly how the two characters respond to challenges.
  • I can collaborate with peers to plan and draft a two-Voice Poem.
  • Comprehension Quiz, Chapter 13: “Los Duraznos/Peaches” (entrance ticket)
  • Two-Voice Poem graphic organizer (side A completed, side B begun)
  • Admit and Exit Tickets

Lesson 14Writing, Critique, and Revising: Two-Voice Poems (Chapter 14: “Las Uvas/Grapes”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use the writing process to produce clear and coherent writing (with support). (W.5.5)
  • I can answer comprehension questions based on text from Esperanza Rising that I have read independently.
  • I can contrast how two characters in Esperanza Rising respond to challenges, using a two-voice poem format.
  • I can use evidence from Esperanza Rising that supports my inferences about two different characters, particularly how the two characters respond to challenges.
  • I can collaborate with peers to plan and draft a two-voice poem.
  • I can give specific feedback that will help other students make their writing better.
  • I can use feedback that I receive from others and self-reflection to improve my writing.
  • Comprehension Quiz, Chapter 14: “Las Uvas/Grapes” (entrance ticket)
  • Two-voice poems (drafts)
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Praise-Question-Suggest

Lesson 15Revisiting Big Metaphors and Themes: Revising and Beginning to Perform Two-Voice Poems

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in text. (RL.5.4) 
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can use quotes to support my inferences in literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can adapt my speech for a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate. (SL.5.6)
  • I can interpret five big metaphors in Esperanza Rising
  • I can explain themes in Esperanza Rising.
  • I can perform my two voice poem.
  • Observation of placement of evidence flags (homework and classwork)
  • Triad discussion/Chalk Talk
  • Two-voice poems
  • Admit and Exit Tickets
  • Chalk Talk

Lesson 16Paragraph Writing, Part I: How Esperanza Responds on the Train (Revisiting Chapter 5: “Las Guayabas/Guavas”)

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use quotes to explain the meaning of literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can use quotes to support my inferences in literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can summarize a literary text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text. (RL.5.3)
  • I can write an informative/explanatory text. (W.5.2)
  • I can use the writing process to produce clear and coherent writing (with support). (W5.5)
  • I can find evidence in Esperanza Rising that will support my inferences about how Esperanza changes throughout the novel. 
  • I can analyze how Esperanza responds to a key event in the novel, and what this shows about her character.
  • I can write an essay in which each paragraph has a clear topic sentence, a body, and a conclusion.
  • Partner Accordion graphic organizer (for Paragraph 1)
  • Partner Draft Paragraph 1 (partially completed)
  • None

Lesson 17Paragraph Writing, Part II

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use quotes to explain the meaning of literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can use quotes to support my inferences in literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text. (RL.5.3)
  • I can write an informative/explanatory text. (W.5.2)
  • I can use the writing process to produce clear and coherent writing (with support). (W.5.5)
  • I can find evidence in Esperanza Rising that will support my inferences about characters from the book.
  • I can analyze how Esperanza responds to a key event in the novel, and what this shows about her character.
  • I can write an essay in which each paragraph has a clear topic sentence, a body, and a conclusion.
  • Accordion graphic organizer for Paragraph 2 (homework)
  • Partner and individual paragraphs
  • None

Lesson 18End-of-Unit 2 Assessment: On-Demand Analytical Essay About How Esperanza Changes Over Time

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can use quotes to explain the meaning of literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can use quotes to support my inferences in literary texts. (RL.5.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can summarize a literary text. (RL.5.2)
  • I can compare and contrast literary elements using details from the text. (RL.5.3)
  • I can write an informative/explanatory text. (W.5.2)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.5.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.5.5)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research. (W.5.9)
  • I can find evidence in Esperanza Rising that will support my inferences about characters from the book. 
  • I can write an informative/explanatory three-paragraph essay that analyzes how Esperanza responds to two key events, and compares and contrasts her response to events over time. 
  • I can write an essay in which each paragraph has a clear topic sentence, a body, and a conclusion.
  • Accordion graphic organizers
  • Partner and individual paragraphs
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment: On-Demand Analytical Essay about How Esperanza Changes over Time
  • None

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up