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ELA G4:M4:U2

Analyzing Characters and How They Contribute to Theme: Reading and Analyzing The Hope Chest

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Listening to and Rereading a Speech by Susan B. Anthony to Infer about Her as a Leader of Change

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can make inferences using specific details from the text. (RI.4.1)
  • I can adjust my writing practices for different time frames, tasks, purposes, and audiences. (W.4.10)
  • I can identify the reason a speaker provides to support a particular point. (SL.4.3)
  • I can make inferences using specific details from the text. (RI.4.1)
  • I can adjust my writing practices for different time frames, tasks, purposes, and audiences. (W.4.10)
  • I can identify the reason a speaker provides to support a particular point. (SL.4.3)
  • Written Conversation papers
  • Close Read recording form
  • Written Conversation

Lesson 2Preparing to Read The Hope Chest by Karen Schwabach

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can summarize informational text. (RI.4.2)
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can explain how the 19th Amendment was passed in 1920, using details from the “Movin’ on Up” section of the text “Order in the Court.”
  • I can use a variety of strategies to help me understand the story elements in the beginning of The Hope Chest.
  • Annotated text for “Movin’ on Up”
  • Triad summary statement for “Movin’ on Up”
  • None

Lesson 3Summarizing Literature and Analyzing Characters: The Hope Chest, Chapter 1

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can summarize a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can compare and contrast different narrators’ points of view. (RL.4.6)
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can summarize Chapter 1 of The Hope Chest using specific details from the text.
  • I can explain the difference between first-person and third-person point of view.
  • I can describe actions Violet takes in Chapter 1 and what this says about the type of person she is.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 1: “The Stolen Letters,” including text-dependent questions (from homework)
  • Exit ticket
  • None

Lesson 4Analyzing Descriptive Language: The Hope Chest, Chapters 1–3

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can analyze the meaning of figurative and complex language. (L.4.5a, c)
  • I can read Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest for gist.
  • I can explain the meaning of simple similes in context.
  • I can name synonyms and antonyms for vocabulary words.
  • Summary statements for Chapters 2 and 3
  • None

Lesson 5Summarizing Literature and Analyzing Characters: The Hope Chest, Chapter 3

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about fourth-grade topics and texts. (SL.4.1a, b)
  • I can summarize a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can use evidence from The Hope Chest when I discuss the text.
  • I can follow the Norms for Triad Talk when I participate in a conversation with my reading partners.
  • I can summarize Chapter 3 of The Hope Chest using specific details from the text.
  • I can describe actions Myrtle takes in Chapter 3 and what this says about the type of person she is.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 3: “Meeting Myrtle” (from homework)
  • Text-dependent questions for Chapter 3
  • None

Lesson 6Clustering Vocabulary to Build Meaning from a Text

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using specific details from the text. (RL.4.1)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of words and phrases. (L.4.4)
  • I can explain the events of Chapters 4 and 5 in The Hope Chest using details from the text.
  • I can sort vocabulary words into categories.
  • I can explain plot events and character details using my understanding of word categories.
  • Reader’s Guides for Chapters 4 and 5 (from homework)
  • Word categories exercises
  • None

Lesson 7Summarizing Chapters 1–6 of The Hope Chest Using a Story Map

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using specific details from the text. (RL.4.1)
  • I can summarize a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can determine the main idea of each chapter I’ve read in The Hope Chest.
  • I can summarize the events of Chapters 1–6 of The Hope Chest.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 6: “It All Comes Down to Tennessee.” (from homework)
  • Chapter 6 summary statement
  • Story Map and Summary: The Hope Chest, Chapters   1–6
  • None

Lesson 8Preparing to Write an Essay about Myrtle: Reading about the Jim Crow Laws

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the main idea using specific details from the text. (RI.4.2)
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9)
  • I can explain why Myrtle was forced to sit in a separate train car in The Hope Chest.
  • I can write a short essay that describes the experience of Myrtle’s ride in the “colored car” in The Hope Chest.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 7: “Heading to Nashville” (from homework
  • Essay planning notes
  • Exit ticket
  • None

Lesson 9Examining the Structure of Short Essays and Gathering Evidence for an Essay about Myrtle

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and information clearly. (W.4.2).
  • I can gather evidence for a short essay that describes how Myrtle was affected by her experience riding in the “colored car” in The Hope Chest.
  • I can describe the basic structure of a short essay.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 8: “In the Jim Crow Car” (from homework)
  • Essay Prompt/Planner
  • Back-to-back and Face-to-Face

Lesson 10Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can summarize a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about fourth-grade topics and texts. (SL.4.1)
  • I can write a focus statement supported by evidence from the text for my essay about Myrtle.
  • I can write a short essay that describes the experience of Myrtle’s ride in the “colored car” in The Hope Chest.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 9: “Mr. Martin’s Escape” (from homework)
  • Short Essay about the Character Myrtle in The Hope Chest
  • Text-dependent questions for Brainstorm Carousel
  • Back-to-back and Face-to-Face

Lesson 11Mid-Unit Assessment: Reading and Answering Questions about a New Chapter of The Hope Chest

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can make inferences using specific details from text. (RL.4.1)
  • I can summarize a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can use context to help me determine what a word or phrase means. (L.4.4)
  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and slight differences in word meanings. (L.4.5)
  • I can develop the topic with facts, definitions, details, and quotations. (W.4.2b)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9)
  • I can describe what happened to Violet in a chapter from The Hope Chest using details from the text.
  • I can summarize a chapter from The Hope Chest.
  • I can write a short essay about Violet supported by evidence from the text.
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Reading and Answering Questions about a New Chapter of The Hope Chest
  • Tracking My Progress, Mid-Unit 2 recording form
  • None

Lesson 12Summarizing The Hope Chest Chapters 7–11 and Interpreting and Creating Cover Art

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can explain what a text says using specific details from the text. (RL.4.1)
  • I can make inferences using specific details from text. (RL.4.1)
  • I can summarize a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can make connections between a text and the text’s visuals. (RL.4.7)
  • I can make connections between a text and an artist’s interpretation of the text through cover art from The Hope Chest.
  • I can summarize the events of Chapters 7–11 of The Hope Chest.
  • I can interpret the events so far in The Hope Chest by creating a new cover.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 11: “Finding Chloe” (from homework)
  • Story Map and Summary: The Hope Chest Chapters 7–11
  • Cover Art Analysis sheet
  • Back-to-back and Face-to-Face

Lesson 13Introducing Literary Theme: Exploring Themes in The Hope Chest

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can explain how to determine a theme in a story.
  • I can determine possible themes for The Hope Chest.
  • I can find evidence of a given theme in The Hope Chest.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 12: “Violet Spies” (from homework)
  • Finding Themes in The Hope Chest handout
  • None

Lesson 14Determining the Central Theme of The Hope Chest

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can determine the central theme of The Hope Chest.
  • I can find evidence of the central theme in the text of The Hope Chest.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 13: “Dead Horse Alley” (from homework)
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 14: “Max Bloomstein’s Pharmacy” (from homework)
  • Violet’s Character anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Myrtle’s Character anchor (begun in Lesson 5)
  • Other Characters’ Actions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 8)
  • Finding the Central Theme in The Hope Chest recording form
  • None

Lesson 15Writing an Essay on Theme: Introducing a Prompt and Analyzing a Model Essay

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and information clearly. (W.4.2)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9a)
  • I can explain how evidence I locate in The Hope Chest is connected to the central theme, “making a difference.”
  • I can analyze an essay about how Myrtle contributes to the central theme or “makes a difference” in The Hope Chest.
  • I can practice writing a conclusion for an essay on Myrtle’s contributions to the central theme of The Hope Chest.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 15: “The Ferocious Mrs. Catt” (from homework)

 

  • Model and Practice Essay on Theme handout
  • None

Lesson 16Preparing to Write an Essay about Theme: Reading and Gathering Evidence from Chapter 17 in The Hope Chest

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and information clearly. (W.4.2)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9a)
  • I can identify evidence of the central theme, “making a difference,” in The Hope Chest.
  • I can explain how the evidence I select contributes to the central theme of The Hope Chest, “making a difference.”
  • I can discuss how Violet contributes to the theme “making a difference” throughout the novel The Hope Chest, using evidence from the text.
  • Reader’s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 16: “Politics and Gunplay” (from homework)
  • Text-dependent questions for Chapter 17
  • Student Copy of the Character anchor charts
  • None

Lesson 17End of Unit Assessment, Part I: Reading and Answering Questions about Characters and Theme

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can summarize a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can determine word meaning in a text. (RL.4.4)
  • I can compare and contrast different narrators’ points of view. (RL.4.6)
  • I can make connections between a text and the text’s visuals. (RL.4.7)
  • I can determine evidence of the central theme, “making a difference,” in a chapter from The Hope Chest.
  • I can summarize a new chapter from The Hope Chest with details about characters, setting, and events from the text.
  • I can make connections between the text and a different version of its cover.
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part I: Reading and Answering Questions about Characters and Theme
  • Tracking My Progress, End of Unit 2, Part I recording form
  • None

Lesson 18End of Unit Assessment, Part II: Writing an Essay about the Theme of The Hope Chest

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2)
  • I can describe a story’s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9)
  • I can write an essay describing how Violet’s character “made a difference” in the novel The Hope Chest.
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part II: Writing an Essay about the Theme of The Hope Chest
  • None

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