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ELA G4:M1B:U1

Reading to Learn about Poetry

Lesson 1Discovering the Topic: What Makes a Poem a Poem?

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can effectively engage in a range of collaborative discussions. (SL.4.1)

    b. I can follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.

    c. I can pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others.

  • I can document what I learn about a topic by taking notes. (W.4.8)

  • I can follow norms for discussion with my classmates.
  • I can record what I notice and wonder about pictures and text in a Carousel protocol.
  • Observations of student discussion
  • I Notice/I Wonder notes on page 1 of students’ reader’s notebooks
  • None

Lesson 2Establishing Reading Routines: Love That Dog Pages 1–5 and “The Red Wheelbarrow” by William Carlos Williams

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (RL.4.1)
  • I can summarize the text, based on details from the story. (RL.4.2)
  • I can describe in depth a character in a story, drawing on specific details in the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can explain the major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text. (RL.4.5)
  • I can summarize pages 1–5 of Love That Dog, based on details from the novel.
  • I can explain what Jack understands about poetry, based on details from Love That Dog.
  • I can identify characteristics of poetry when analyzing the poem “The Red Wheelbarrow.”
  • Summary notes
  • Jack’s Reflection notes: “The Red Wheelbarrow”
  • What Makes a Poem a Poem? anchor chart
  • None

Lesson 3Practicing Reading Closely: Love That Dog Pages 6–11 and “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (RL.4.1)
  • I can summarize the text, based on details from the story. (RL.4.2)
  • I can describe in depth a character in a story, drawing on specific details in the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can explain the major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text. (RL.4.5)
  • I can summarize pages 6–11 of Love That Dog, based on details from the novel.
  • I can explain what Jack understands about poetry, based on details from Love That Dog.
  • I can identify characteristics of poetry by analyzing the poem “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”.
  • Poetry Task 1 (from homework)
  • Summary notes
  • Love That Dog pages 6–11, and poetry note-catcher
  • What Make a Poem a Poem? anchor chart
  • None

Lesson 4Using Evidence in Text-Based Discussions: How Jack’s Attitude Towards Poetry is Changing

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (RL.4.1)
  • I can summarize the text, based on details from the story. (RL.4.2)
  • I can describe in depth a character in a story, drawing on specific details in the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can explain the major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text. (RL.4.5)
  • I can analyze how Jack’s attitude toward poetry is changing, using evidence from the text.
  • I can identify characteristics of poetry by analyzing the poem “Dog.”
  • I can explain what Jack understands about poetry, based on evidence from Love That Dog.
  • Summary notes
  • Students’ references to Text Evidence sentence strips in discussion
  • Jack’s Reflections notes: “Dog” by Valerie Worth
  • What Makes a Poem a Poem? anchor chart
  • None

Lesson 5Mid-Unit Assessment: Text Dependent Questions: Love That Dog, Pages 20–24

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (RL.4.1)
  • I can describe in depth a character in a story, drawing on specific details in the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can explain what Jack understands about poetry, based on evidence from Love That Dog.
  • I can reflect on my progress toward the learning target.
  • Poetry Task 2 (in poetry journal; from homework)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Text-Dependent Questions: Love That Dog, pages 20–24
  • Reflection in poetry journal
  • None

Lesson 6Reading Closely and Shared Writing: Love That Dog, Pages 25–30

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can summarize the text, based on details from the story. (RL.4.2)
  • I can describe in depth a character in a story, drawing on specific details in the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.4.4)
  • I can draw evidence from literary texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9)
  • I can summarize pages 25–30 of Love That Dog, based on details from the novel.
  • I can explain what Jack understands about poetry, based on details from Love That Dog.
  • With peers, I can write a paragraph to explain what Jack has learned about poetry, based on his poem “You Come Too.”
  • Summary notes
  • Close Read Questions and Notes: Love That Dog, pages 25–30
  • Topic Expansion graphic organizer
  • What Makes a Poem a Poem? anchor chart
  • None

Lesson 7Explaining and Making Inferences Based on Details: Love That Dog Pages 31–41, “Street Music” by Arnold Adoff, and “The Apple” by S.C. Rigg

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (RL.4.1)
  • I can summarize the text, based on details from the story. (RL.4.2)
  • I can describe in depth a character in a story, drawing on specific details in the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can explain the major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text. (RL.4.5)
  • I can summarize pages 31–41 of Love That Dog, based on details from the novel.
  • I can explain what Jack understands about poetry, based on details from Love That Dog.
  • I can identify characteristics of poetry by analyzing the poems “Street Music” and “The Apple.”
  • Poetry Task 3 (in poetry journal; from homework)
  • Summary notes
  • Jack’s Reflections notes
  • What Makes a Poem a Poem? anchor chart 
  • None

Lesson 8End of Unit Assessment: Extended Response: Love That Dog, Pages 1–41: What Has Jack Learned about Poetry?

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can describe in depth a character in a story, drawing on specific details in the text. (RL.4.3)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.4.4)
  • I can draw evidence from literary texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9)
  • I can plan and write a quality paragraph to explain what Jack has learned about poetry, using details and examples from pages 1–41 of Love That Dog as evidence.
  • I can reflect on my progress toward the learning target.
  • Poetry Task 4 (in journal; from homework)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment
  • Reflection in poetry journal
  • None

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