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ELA G3:M1:U2

Building the Power of Reading

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 5-20 lessons. The “unit at a glance” chart in the curriculum map breaks down each unit into its lessons, to show how the curriculum is organized in terms of standards address, supporting targets, ongoing assessment, and protocols. It also indicates which lessons include the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.

Lesson 1Close Reading of Thank You, Mr. Falker: Identifying the Superpowers of Reading

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can identify the main message or lesson of a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2)
  • I can describe the characters in a story (their traits, motivations, feelings). (RL.3.3)
  • I can describe how a character’s actions contribute to the events in the story. (RL.3.3) 
  • I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories. (W.3.8)
  • I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults. (SL.3.1)
  • I can identify the main message of Thank You, Mr. Falker by reading excerpts from the text closely.
  • I can sort key details from Thank You, Mr. Falker into categories.
  • I can describe what the main character wanted and what she did.
  • I can discuss how the main message of Thank You, Mr. Falker is conveyed through key details.
  • Close Read recording form (Parts 1 and 2)
  • None

Lesson 2Continued Close Reading of Thank You, Mr. Falker: Text-Dependent Questions and Vocabulary

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can answer questions using specific details from the text. (RL.3.1) 
  • I can explain what I understand about the topic being discussed. (SL.3.1)
  • I can use what the sentence says to help me determine what a word or phrase means. (L.3.4)
  • I can answer questions using specific details from Thank You, Mr. Falker.
  • I can explain why I chose specific details to answer questions about the text.
  • I can determine the meaning of new vocabulary using clues in the text around a word.
  • Close Read recording forms (completed) for Thank You, Mr. Falker
  • Thank You, Mr. Falker: Questions from the Text
  • Vocabulary cards
  • Think-Pair-Share
  • Quiz-Quiz-Trade

Lesson 3Close Reading of The Boy Who Loved Words: How Do People Build Their Word Power?

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can identify the main message or lesson of a story using key details from the text. (RL.3.2) 
  • I can describe the characters in a story (their traits, motivations, feelings). (RL.3.3)
  • I can describe how a character’s actions contribute to the events in the story. (RL.3.3)
  • I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories. (W.3.8)
  • I can effectively participate in a conversation with my peers and adults. (SL.3.1)
  • I can identify the main message of The Boy Who Loved Words by reading excerpts from the text closely.
  • I can describe what the main character wanted and what he did.
  • I can sort key details from The Boy Who Loved Words into categories.
  • I can discuss how the main message of The Boy Who Loved Words is conveyed through key details.
  • Close Read recording form (Parts 1 and 2)
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 4Vocabulary: Finding the Meaning of Words in Context in The Boy Who Loved Words

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can answer questions using specific details from the text. (RL.3.1) 
  • I can explain what I understand about the topic being discussed. (SL.3.1)
  • I can use what the sentence says to help me determine what a word or phrase means. (L.3.4)
  • I can answer questions using details from The Boy Who Loved Words.
  • I can explain why I chose specific details to answer questions about the text.
  • I can determine the meaning of a word using clues in the text around it. 
  • In advance: Pull two sentences from the book The Boy Who Loved Words, each with a new vocabulary word in it. Use sentences other than those on the Using Context Clues handout. Cut the sentence up, so each individual word is on its own piece of paper. Either write the new vocabulary word in a different color or highlight it to stand out.
  • This lesson includes a kinesthetic activity that allows students to physically move and manipulate words in order to think about how to understand vocabulary in context.  Read through the work time notes carefully in order to visualize the activity and the necessary preparation.
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 5Independent Reading: Building the Power of Stamina

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can identify the main message or lesson of a story using key details from the text. (R.L.3.2)
  • I can make connections between texts and ideas to comprehend what I read. (R.L.3.11)
  • I can choose a text that interests me. (RL.3.11)
  • I can identify the main message of The Incredible Book-Eating Boy.
  • I can make connections between my life, other books, or ideas to help me understand The Incredible Book-Eating Boy.
  • I can demonstrate stamina as I read a book that interests me.
  • Teacher observation
  • Student notes
  • Reading Stamina tracker
  • Final Word Fishbowl Discussion

Lesson 6Reading Proficiently and Independently: The Power of Setting Goals

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can document what I learn about a topic by sorting evidence into categories. (W.3.8)

 

  • I can identify my reading strengths and challenges in order to set goals for becoming an independent and proficient reader.
  • I can sort information about my strengths and challenges as a reader into categories.
  • Information/Evidence recording form
  • Accordion graphic organizer
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 7Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: On-Demand Informational Writing

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can write an informative/explanatory text. (W.3.2)
  • I can accurately use third-grade academic vocabulary to express my ideas. (L.3.6)
  • I can write an informative letter that explains my goals for becoming an independent and proficient reader and supports them with facts and details.
  • I can use third-grade vocabulary.
  • Teacher observation
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 8Developing Reading Fluency: Criteria for Reading Aloud

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can demonstrate fluency when reading stories or poems for an audio recording. (SL.3.5)

 

  • I can identify the skills of a fluent reader.
  • I can practice reading an excerpt from my independent reading book with fluency.
  • Student Criteria recording form
  • Fluent Reading Criteria checklist (completed after listening to individual students read)
  • None

Lesson 9Developing Reading Fluency: Selecting a Text and Practicing Reading Aloud

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can choose texts that interest me. (RL.3.11a)
  • I can demonstrate fluency when reading stories or poems for an audio recording. (SL.3.5)
  • I can choose a text that interests me for my read-aloud recording.
  • I can use the criteria of a fluent reader to practice.
  • Student book selection
  • Fluent Reader Criteria checklist (completed by the teacher after listening to individual students read)
  • Think-Pair-Share

Lesson 10Developing Reading Fluency: Beginning the End of Unit 2 Assessment

Long Term Targets Supporting Targets Ongoing Assessments Protocols
  • I can demonstrate fluency when reading stories or poems for an audio recording. (SL.3.5)

 

  • I can improve my fluency using feedback from others.
  • I can read the Helen Keller text fluently for an audio recording.
  • Fluent Reader Criteria list, completed by peer
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment
  • Think-Pair-Share

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